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  • YOGA CLASSES MARRAKECH

    YOGA CLASSES MARRAKECH
    YOGA CLASSES ARE HELD IN THE HEART OF GUELIZ IN YOGA STUDIO THREE TIMES A WEEK MONDAY WEDNESDAY FRIDAY 8H TO 9H15 CLASSES ARE MIXED LEVELS ALL ARE WELCOME MATS PROVIDED ADDRESS,, RUE VIEUX MARRACKCHI NEXT TO RUE LIBERTE OFF MOHAMMED 5,, NEXT TO NEW MALL CARRE EDEN ENQUIRES HEARTOFA@GMAIL.COM 0675736448
  • KUAN YIN

    KUAN YIN
    KUAN YIN,, GODDESS OF COMPASSION AND WISDOM,,, 
  • ASHTANGHA YOGA MARRAKECH

    ASHTANGHA YOGA MARRAKECH
    ASHTANGA YOGA MARRAKECH OFFERS WEEKELY GROUP CLASSES OR PRIVATE LESSONS, AT HOTELS, RESIDENCES, VILLAS,,,,,,, ONE HOUR ONE HOUR HALF TAILOR MADE TO GROUPS , INDIVIDUALS  ENQUIRIES HEARTOFA@GMAIL.COM
  • YOGA MUDRA YOGA

    YOGA MUDRA YOGA
    YOGA MARRAKECH IS HAVING A WEEKEND OF MUDRA MEDITATION WORK,, SATURDAY MORNING AND SUNDAY MORNING IN MARCH   MUDRA WORK IS INTERESTING AS IT IS A WAY TO HEAL ,, STRENGTHEN ,,RESTORE AND NOURISH THE BODY    THERE ARE MANY MUDRAS,, OFTEN CALLED YOGA OF THE HANDS   WORKSHOP IS 3 HOURS ENQUIRES HEARTOFA@GMAIL.COM
  • MEDITATION CLASSES IN MARRAKECH

    MEDITATION CLASSES IN MARRAKECH
    YOGA MARRAKECH IS STARTING WEEKLY MEDITATION CLASSES COME SPRING, THESE CLASSES ARE OPEN TO ANYONE AND WILL BE HELD WEEKLY AT YOGA MARRAKECH CENTER NEAR THE STADIUM. FOR FURTHER INFO CONTACT HEARTOFA@GMAIL.COM
 
 
  • Free Online Kundalini Yoga Poses and Exercises
  • The Life of a Soul Warrior: Looking Back

    The Life of a Soul Warrior: Looking Back

     Welcome to an article by our new guest contributor, Dr. Bina Nangia. Dr. Nangia is a long-time spiritual seeker who works with children. This week she looks at a warrior of the soul who is reviewing her life to date.

    Today the warrior looks back.

    She has so many times been afraid of going into battle.

    She has said ?yes? when she wanted to say ?no? and at times failed in her spiritual duties. Every warrior of the soul must have suffered for the silliest reasons. At some times must have lied or betrayed someone in the past. The warrior now knows she must have at times even hurt someone she loves; for every warrior must have trodden a path that was not theirs.

    But now she looks back and knows that she has been through all this and yet has never lost hope of being better than she is.

    At this moment she realizes that all her battles were necessary to help her go across and reach that inner self where only she can enter and knows the truth. All the battles were orchestrated absolutely perfectly and now she can look upon all of those as necessary experiences.

    She now realizes the importance of all those situations and circumstances which came her way. 

    The soul warrior always listens to the words of certain thinkers such as these by T.H.Huxley:

    ?The consequences of our actions are the scarecrows of fools and the beacons of wise men?.

    The chessboard is the world, the pieces are the gestures of our daily life, and the rules of the games are what we call the laws of nature. The players on the other side are hidden from us, but we know that HIS play is always fair, just and patient. The warrior simply has to accept the challenge.

    She knows that God never overlooks a single mistake by those he loves, nor does he allow his favourites to pretend ignorance of the rules of the game.

    When life lives through the soul warrior and she experiences the experiences, she realizes the importance of spending time with herself. This time she knows is most important to re-connect, contemplate and reflect, and so even in the midst of battles she manages to meditate.

    There is fast movement all around her, things are happening at such a fast pace, that the soul warrior is awestruck but during these times she often sits down, relaxes and lets everything just happen, the way it is happening. She merely witnesses and lovingly surrenders to all movement of life around her.

    Earlier what seemed difficult and impossible looks well orchestrated. The soul warrior is glad and offers silent prayers to God and her masters.

    The soul warrior has learnt patience over her battles which were difficult and understands their purpose. There has been restlessness, uncertainty, anxiety, but replacing these with courage, she has won many inner battles.

    The warrior has realized that the words ?worrier? and ?warrior? look alike except for the ?a?. This means the ?attitudes? of the warrior. For a soul warrior her attitudes have kept her going, never faltering remaining steadfast calm and composed. She views life with tenderness and determination. Her attitudes coupled with faith, belief and determination will help her ultimately solve the mysteries of life and complete the task of the universe.

    She understands that life is beauty and sees a profound awareness in that beauty. The greatest wisdom lies in choosing this awareness wisely.

    The soul warrior is so determined that she will never give up. She will continue to sail her boat of actions with God?s breadth upon the sails, directing, nudging, motivating and cajoling her into doing what she is meant to do.

    She drifts slowly but surely with steadfastness and determination to carry the soul?s messages to other soul warriors.

    There are no resentments, judgements, expectations, attachments only unconditional love and appreciation to one and all. 

     

     About Dr. Bina Nangia

    Dr. Nangia currently works with special kids. This is her calling and she has been working in this field for 20 years.

    A grandmother of two boys, Dr. Nangia has been practising yoga since her younger days. Her keen interest in spirituality over many years has got her in touch with many masters. They have contributed to her growth tremendously. She shares her thoughts in magazines and newspaper articles.

    Dr. Nangia is the author of Dyslexia Decoded, a handbook for special educators, which was recently published by Penguin and Hayhouse.

    She shares her experiences about special education on various social networking sites, and is a trained therapist and family networker.

    Dr. Nangia lives in Delhi, India. 

     

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    2. How to Discover Your Soul, Atman or Higher Self
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  • Why It?s Important to be Flexible with Your Yoga Practice

    Why It?s Important to be Flexible with Your Yoga Practice

    Our popular contributor Kara-Leah intimately understands the psychology of maintaining a home yoga practice. Here she breaks down five ways to stay flexible and fluid even as your life shifts and changes so you can maintain a regular practice.

    by Kara-Leah Grant

    Author of Forty Days of Yoga ? Breaking down the barriers to a home yoga practice.

    Life is busy.

    Most of us are juggling some combination of work, family, socialising, passions & hobbies and health & well-being. Sometimes, despite our best intentions, the things that we know make us feel the best - like regular yoga practice - can be the most difficult to maintain.

    This is especially true when we go through a life change, or a particularly stressful period.

    Right when we need it most, our yoga practice falls away. Our job changes, or we shift house, or we have a baby and that change of routine means we can't make it to our regular yoga class anymore, or we don't have the same time to do our home practice.

    Sometimes the change is physical or emotional - we injure ourselves, have major surgery, experience some type of mental illness, or experience a family crisis like the death of a loved one. It becomes physically, or emotionally impossible to continue on with the practice we love.

    Yet in these moments of change the biggest  barrier to continuing our yoga practice is not the shift in our life's circumstances but our mind's inability to accept and roll with those changes.

    We're attached to the practice we have been doing and find it difficult to consider doing something different.

    • We want to continue our strong physical practice.
    • We want to keep going to that studio or that teacher.
    • We don't want to practice at home because it requires more determination, more discipline, more effort form us.

    But if we're honest with ourselves, we'll realise that there is a desire or want that flies above all of these - the desire or want to reap the benefits of continuing to have yoga in our lives. When we can keep our eyes on that want, on that desire, and let it guide our actions, then all the other smaller wants of the ego fall away.

    And this of course is what yoga is all about - not just about flexibility of body, but also flexibility of mind.

    It means we're able to accept that we can't make it to that particular class anymore, but we can get to a later one if we're willing to change teacher or studio. Or maybe our time is so limited that we realise getting to and from a studio isn't possible anymore, but we can carve out half an hour a day if we're willing to dedicate ourselves to a home practice.

    After giving birth to my son in 2010, an emergency c-section meant a far longer period of recovery than I'd been expecting. It meant I was unable to dive back into my asana practice at all. Having a newborn in the house also meant nights of unbroken sleep. It would have been easy to just let my practice go completely, and come back to it once I was physically stronger, and getting some more sleep.

    However, I was fortunate enough to know enough about yoga to understand that just because I couldn't get on a yoga mat and physically move through postures didn't mean I couldn't still practice.

    And I knew exactly what the perfect practice would be for me at this time - Yoga Nidra.

    Far more than just a guided meditation,  Yoga Nidra was devised by Swami Satyananda to specifically work with the deep subconscious.

    In Satyananda  Yoga Nidra the distractions of the mind are contained and the mind is allowed to relax - truly relax - via the practice of pratyahara.

    Pratyahara is the fifth of Patanjali's eight limbs of yoga and is best translated as 'withdrawal of the senses'. It bridges the external limbs of yoga - like asana and pranayama - and the internal limbs of yoga, like samadhi. In  Yoga Nidra, you lie flat on your back, eyes closed, withdrawing from all external inputs as you listen to a Satyananda teacher (or CD) take you through the  Yoga Nidra practice.

    Nothing is required except your attention, and your presence, yet  Yoga Nidra has a profound transformative effect because it systematically induces complete physical, mental and emotional relaxation. During the practice, one appears to be asleep, but the consciousness is functioning at a deeper level of awareness.

    It's said that a Yoga Nidra practice is worth two to four hours of regular sleep - perfect for a sleep-deprived, physically incapacitated new mum. All I had to do was plug my headphones into my iPhone when the baby was sleeping, lie down, and push play.

    While a small part of me still felt like I wasn't really practicing yoga, the rest of me knew that this practice was perfect for right now. Despite only getting four to six hours of unbroken sleep every night, I didn't feel tired during the day at all. The  Yoga Nidra practice was providing the appropriate nourishment for my daily life.

    It reminded me that no matter what is going on in your life right now - no matter how stressful it is, no matter how busy you are, no matter how crazy your routine, or lack of routine is - there is a perfect yoga practice for you.

    The trick is figuring out what it is, learning it from a qualified instructor, and then committing to it.

    1. It helps to start with the commitment - to acknowledge how much you gain from practicing yoga daily, and how important it is to you to continue on with that daily practice. Sometimes writing down this desire can help solidify our commitment to it.

    2. Once you've made that commitment, take an honest look at the daily circumstances of your life and ask yourself what it is you need most. Not what you want, but what you need.

    • Do you need something to help you manage anxiety?
    • Something to help you rehabilitate an injury or from surgery?
    • Something to help you get healthier and make better eating choices?
    • Something that provides a sanctuary and some 'me' time?

    3. Armed with commitment, and an understanding of what you need, do some research to find out what your perfect practice is. The best research is to talk to an experienced yoga teacher who can give you a specific practice. But if that person isn't available, search the net, do some reading, talk to some yoga friends.

    4. Take that practice and decide how often you're going to do it, and when you're going to do it. Make this decision according to what you need, rather then what you want. You may not want to get out of bed half an hour earlier, but it may be what's needed.

    5. Just do it. OK, so this is likely the hardest part of it all... but all you need do is show up on your mat. Truly. Get on your mat, and then whatever your practice is will flow. (Assuming your practice requires a mat. Maybe the perfect practice for you has turned out to be an hour of silent chanting while commuting to work in the morning.)

    6. Pay attention to results. All kinds of results. How does it feel when you stick to your commitment and do your practice? How does it feel when something interferes and you don't do your practice?

    On the days when I didn't do my Yoga Nidra... boy did I notice it. I felt tired, grumpy, spaced out, and stuck in my head. It was all the motivation I needed to get back to my daily practice.

    I was definitely excited to get back to asana when my body had healed sufficiently. But in those first five weeks, it was really beneficial to regularly practice Yoga Nidra. (Here's a link to the Yoga Nidra I used.)

    About Kara-Leah

    Kara-Leah is a writer and yoga teacher who has always been infinitely curious about the make-up of the human psyche and body. Regular yoga helped her heal and recover from chronic back issues, including a spinal fusion at age 16, and two episodes of psychosis at age 29. 

    Her daily home yoga practice began in earnest when people kept asking her to teach them yoga.  She?s since trained as a teacher with Shiva Rea, and immersed herself in practicing, teaching yoga and writing about yoga. Kara-Leah lives just outside of Queenstown, New Zealand with her son Samuel. 

    She?s the publisher of The Yoga Lunchbox and published her first book, Forty Days of Yoga ? Breaking down the barriers to a home yoga practice in 2013. Her second book, The No-More-Excuses Guide to Yogahas just been releasedShe?s also a regular contributor to the Elephant Journal 

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    Related posts:
    1. How to Stay Motivated for Home Yoga Practice
    2. How to Anchor Your Home Yoga Practice with a Sadhana
    3. What Really Counts as a Home Yoga Practice?
    4. 10 Important Guidelines for Kundalini Yoga Practice
    5. Important Hatha Yoga Posture for October Practice
  • Relax and Flow Like a River

    Relax and Flow Like a River

     Welcome to an article by our new guest contributor, Dr. Bina Nangia. Dr. Nangia is a long-time spiritual seeker who works with children.

    The river does not even know its destiny and it is born. As a little trickle from the rain waters or the snow melting, it does not know. Creation has sent it forth and it is not even aware of its destination.

    Somewhere there?s a knowing, but at that stage it?s all a mystery.

    What will the river see, meet and experience?

    The script is already there, now it only remains to unfold.

    At first the river is keen to know a lot of things, but as time goes by, it starts to just flow. Now it has to be with the flowing, resisting judging, wanting nothing.

    Even the urge to meet the ocean and become one with it is a far dream. But there?s a knowing which propels it to keep moving. So much to experience on the way, it gurgles with excitement. The pebbles underneath, the twigs from trees, the music of the winds, it wants to embrace it all. All seems a sweeping dream.

    It is reminded of its destination.

    The ocean, that?s what I am looking for!

    The river is simple. All it understands is its nature to flow, and in complete faith it flows. With the banks as two guidelines it tries to reach out to whoever and whatever comes by.

    An oneness and openness to receive and give is it nature. It is so sure of it.

    There?s a constant knowing of its nature which keeps it focussed on its goal. An excitement of reaching the ocean and merging with it, but it does not let this excitement lessen its scripted journey.

    ?The journey is the destination? it reminds itself and continues with renewed enthusiasm and fervour. 

     About Dr. Bina Nangia

    Dr. Nangia currently works with special kids. This is her calling and she has been working in this field for 20 years.

    A grandmother of two boys, Dr. Nangia has been practising yoga since her younger days. Her keen interest in spirituality over many years has got her in touch with many masters. They have contributed to her growth tremendously. She shares her thoughts in magazines and newspaper articles.

    Dr. Nangia is the author of Dyslexia Decoded, a handbook for special educators, which was recently published by Penguin and Hayhouse.

    She shares her experiences about special education on various social networking sites, and is a trained therapist and family networker.

    Dr. Nangia lives in Delhi, India. 

     

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    Related posts:
    1. How to Relax Your Mind | Tao Te Ching on Having Peace of Mind
    2. Surrender and Letting Go: Why ‘Ananda’ is the True Happiness
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  • Does the Media Image of Yoga Stop People From Giving it a Go?

    Does the Media Image of Yoga Stop People From Giving it a Go?

    Our popular contributor Kara-Leah has written her second book, The No-More-Excuses Guide to Yoga. Pre-sales have just started, and you're invited to be involved. Read more below. 

    by Kara-Leah Grant, author of The No-More-Excuses Guide to Yoga

    I'm in Auckland, New Zealand back in 1995, which seems a long, long time ago.

    I've dropped out of my second year at University - ostensibly because my back issues and serious sciatic pain made sitting for lectures impossible , but there were other, deeper reasons too. (i.e. my habitual response when facing serious challenge ? run!)

    Regardless, I was in chronic back pain and a good friend suggested we go and do a ten week beginners Iyengar yoga course that his friend was teaching.

    Now this was before the internet, before yoga selfies, maybe even before Yoga Journal had found it?s way to New Zealand.

    I have no recollection what-so-ever of knowing what yoga was, or what it looked like. I can?t remember even having seen a yoga posture.

    Certainly there was no great wealth of resources freely available like you'll find here on Anmol's website. 

    All I knew was that I was in pain, I could barely move, I had serious flexibility issues and my friend seemed to think that yog might help - whatever this yoga thing was.

    I turned up, and despite my limited range of mobility and pain, was well-looked after and supported into postures with multiple props. (Iyengar Yoga can be a great foundation for beginner yogis).

    I wonder though, if I was in the same physical position today, would I have made it to yoga class?

    Why the difference?

    Because now we?re inundated with thousands of yoga images and selfies in our social media streams.

     Now, yoga is a multi-billion dollar industry and images of asana and meditation are used to sell everything from soft drinks to cleaning products and clothing.

    Now, everyone knows what yoga looks like ? right? It looks super-flexible, slim, gorgeous and young - mostly.

    Therefore, if I were contemplating starting yoga in 2014, would I have this image of yoga as something that fit, gorgeous, bendy people do and therefore something that was not for me?

    It?s a question that?s impossible to answer.

    Yet I suspect that there are now probably hundreds if not thousands of people out there who would love to try yoga but don?t because it?s really intimidating to go to your first yoga class ? especially if you don?t look anything like the common image of a yogi.

     Some of them may even be reading this website, looking to find out information before venturing off to their first yoga class.

    Back in 1995, I was fortunate. Pain and total inflexibility were the only things holding me back and I had a caring and patient friend who literally hand-held me to my first yoga class.

    But what about those who don?t?

    What about all those people who would love to try yoga but are put off by the clothing required, the perceived level of flexibility required, the weird language that?s used, the strange sounds you might make or the confusion of all the styles of yoga available?

    What about all those people who might have dabbled in yoga, but are now asking how do you find a good teacher? How do you know if someone is a good teacher? How do you decide which style of yoga is for you? What if you don?t want to do postures ? is there something else you can do that?s yoga?

    These are the people I?ve written The No-More-Excuses Guide to Yoga for ? I?ve taken my experiences of yoga over the last fifteen years and distilled it down into a book so I can hand-hold people into their first yoga class and beyond.

    As part of my commitment to broadening the yoga student base, I?m donating $1 from every print copy of The No-More-Excuses Guide to Yoga to the Yoga Education in Prisons Trust plus 5% of e-copies. This is in addition to the $1 per copy of Forty Days of Yoga and 5% of online copies I donate.

    I want No-More-Excuses to be the kind of book that people buy for their friends, because they know it will support them as they start their yoga journey. 

    Yoga changed my life and my world, and it began with that first Iyengar class back in 1995. I?m forever grateful to the friend who took me to class, and the teachers who made me feel welcome and comfortable.

    Now I hope this book can provide the same type of service to the hundreds and thousands of people out there who want to try yoga but are afraid, for whatever reason, to make it to their first yoga class.

    About Kara-Leah

    Kara-Leah is a writer and yoga teacher who has always been infinitely curious about the make-up of the human psyche and body. Regular yoga helped her heal and recover from chronic back issues, including a spinal fusion at age 16, and two episodes of psychosis at age 29. 

    Her daily home yoga practice began in earnest when people kept asking her to teach them yoga.  She?s since trained as a teacher with Shiva Rea, and immersed herself in practicing, teaching yoga and writing about yoga. Kara-Leah lives just outside of Queenstown, New Zealand with her son Samuel. 

    She?s the publisher of The Yoga Lunchbox and published her first book, Forty Days of Yoga ? Breaking down the barriers to a home yoga practice in 2013. Her second book, The No-More-Excuses Guide to Yoga, has just been releasedShe?s also a regular contributor to the Elephant Journal  

    Connect w/ Anmol

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    Related posts:
    1. The Golden Rule to Stop Excuses and Start Meditation Now
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    5. Why Do I Resist my Yoga Practice When I Know it’s Good For Me?
  • Surrender and Letting Go: Why ?Ananda? is the True Happiness

    Surrender and Letting Go: Why ?Ananda? is the True Happiness

    Welcome to an article by our new guest contributor, Dr. Bina Nangia. Dr. Nangia is a long-time spiritual seeker who works with children. This week she looks at what it really means to surrender and let go.  

    In this world of names and forms, we are easily tempted with our senses to pursue, that, which seems real to us. We have no experience of any other perception. The chase is endless and due to the ?law of diminishing returns? the chase never ends. 

    With knowledge of our true nature, and the higher perception of the reality of names and forms, we can surrender and let go.

    True nature means understanding our completeness and letting go of the need to run after names and forms to complete it. The incompleteness never gets full and our senses get dragged from objects, people, and situations. These being finite, are never able to complete us. So we can surrender to that completeness within us to feel complete and whole. This ?ananda? is the true happiness.

    Recognising the infinite truth, being in the consciousness, we can surrender and experience the infinite happiness and bliss.

    How is this possible? By ending every ?perception? with ?perception? and not letting our senses be pulled away. We need to let go of our attachments to names and forms and surrender to our higher self.

    Attachments are not easy to let go, unless we have something higher and better to attach to. For example when we climb a ladder, unless we hold on to the higher rung, we will not let go of the lower one. Both activities need to go on simultaneously.

    In our attachments, the higher rung is the true knowledge of ?self?. By continuous practise, meditation and reading of scriptures, we can draw this knowledge from within us, where it already exists.

    Spirituality is the direction of attaching to the higher and letting go of our attachments. It is a serious dedication to higher understanding and not a part-time pastime. It is the constant awareness of ?truth?. Surrendering our ?ego? and limited self to this discovery pulls us towards completeness. Letting go happens as a result of this surrendering.

    The mind can be our worst enemy or our best friend. It depends on how we recognise its usefulness and train it. It is powerful equipment for our use, but only under the guidance of a sharp intellect. With many births of conditioned thinking and responses, the intellect has fallen from its usefulness as an instrument of discrimination. Instead, the mind runs on its whims and fancies, without discrimination and endlessly attaches itself to various names, forms and situations.

    It?s our work to lift the intellect from where it has fallen with regular practise of yoga and meditation.

    The mind then gets tamed to surrender and let go.

     About Dr. Bina Nangia

    Dr. Nangia currently works with special kids. This is her calling and she has been working in this field for 20 years.

    A grandmother of two boys, Dr. Nangia has been practising yoga since her younger days. Her keen interest in spirituality over many years has got her in touch with many masters. They have contributed to her growth tremendously. She shares her thoughts in magazines and newspaper articles.

    Dr. Nangia is the author of Dyslexia Decoded, a handbook for special educators, which was recently published by Penguin and Hayhouse.

    She shares her experiences about special education on various social networking sites, and is a trained therapist and family networker.

    Dr. Nangia lives in Delhi, India. 

    Connect w/ Anmol

    facebook icontwitter iconyoutube iconRSS iconlinkedin icongoggle plus icon

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  • Young Yoga Masters
  • Facing Fear on a Personal Note and a Spooktacular Halloween Craft

    Facing Fear on a Personal Note and a Spooktacular Halloween Craft
    The topic of Halloween and facing fear feels appropriate for personal fears I'm facing and Halloween classes. Get activities for great Halloween Kids Yoga classes and a fun craft making lion masks that kids of all ages loved.
  • Creative Ways to Get Kids Yoga into Schools

    Creative Ways to Get Kids Yoga into Schools
    Back to School isn’t just for kids! Come get trained as a kids yoga teacher - next training starts September 20, 2014!  You’ll have so many wonderful ideas to bring yoga into your classroom. In 2010, I wrote about How to Start a Kids Yoga Program at a School.  Well, things have changed in schools […]
  • Back to School Kids Yoga Lesson Plan

    Back to School Kids Yoga Lesson Plan
    A Zen story yoga lesson plan for Back to school that kids love about what it means to listen and learn. The Story of the Empty Cup with a yoga for children twist.
  • 5 Kids Yoga Activities to Enhance Your Camps this Summer

    5 Kids Yoga Activities to Enhance Your Camps this Summer
    It’s summer!  Which means kids yoga camps and time to try fresh ideas that you just don’t have time to try in a regular class. I’m planning a summer camp right now.  It’s 18 hours of kids yoga over 5 days in our 10 Day Kids Yoga Teacher – Summer Certification.  So going through my […]
  • I Need Your Advice for Kids Yoga with Different Age Groups?

    I Need Your Advice for Kids Yoga with Different Age Groups?
    I’m working on a new quick reference chart (below) for teaching yoga to children of different age groups. I’m making the chart because so many new kids yoga teachers wonder about teaching specific ages, things like: “What age range should I choose for my studio classes or summer camps?” “Are games too juvenile for teens?” […]