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  • Yoga Marrakech
  • MEDITATION CLASSES IN MARRAKECH

    MEDITATION CLASSES IN MARRAKECH
    Come first Thursday in Febuary,, meditation classes will be held on a Thursday morning at 8h,,,, there will be brief instruction followed by 45 min to 50 min sitting,, followed by questions and sharing. All are welcome from beginner to experienced,, classes are open to everyone,, please bring blanket and yoga mat if you wish […]
  • YOGA CLASSES MARRAKECH

    YOGA CLASSES MARRAKECH
    YOGA CLASSES ARE HELD IN THE HEART OF GUELIZ IN YOGA STUDIO THREE TIMES A WEEK MONDAY WEDNESDAY FRIDAY 8H TO 9H15 CLASSES ARE MIXED LEVELS ALL ARE WELCOME MATS PROVIDED ADDRESS,, RUE VIEUX MARRACKCHI NEXT TO RUE LIBERTE OFF MOHAMMED 5,, NEXT TO NEW MALL CARRE EDEN ENQUIRES HEARTOFA@GMAIL.COM 0675736448
  • KUAN YIN

    KUAN YIN
    KUAN YIN,, GODDESS OF COMPASSION AND WISDOM,,, 
  • ASHTANGHA YOGA MARRAKECH

    ASHTANGHA YOGA MARRAKECH
    ASHTANGA YOGA MARRAKECH OFFERS WEEKELY GROUP CLASSES OR PRIVATE LESSONS, AT HOTELS, RESIDENCES, VILLAS,,,,,,, ONE HOUR ONE HOUR HALF TAILOR MADE TO GROUPS , INDIVIDUALS  ENQUIRIES HEARTOFA@GMAIL.COM
  • YOGA MUDRA YOGA

    YOGA MUDRA YOGA
    YOGA MARRAKECH IS HAVING A WEEKEND OF MUDRA MEDITATION WORK,, SATURDAY MORNING AND SUNDAY MORNING IN MARCH   MUDRA WORK IS INTERESTING AS IT IS A WAY TO HEAL ,, STRENGTHEN ,,RESTORE AND NOURISH THE BODY    THERE ARE MANY MUDRAS,, OFTEN CALLED YOGA OF THE HANDS   WORKSHOP IS 3 HOURS ENQUIRES HEARTOFA@GMAIL.COM
 
 
  • Free Online Kundalini Yoga Poses and Exercises
  • Can We Find Enlightenment One Drop of Sweat at a Time?

    Can We Find Enlightenment One Drop of Sweat at a Time?

    Our popular contributor Kara-Leah writes about all kinds of things, from home practice and parenting to the etiquettes of yoga class and the ethics of yoga. In this article she reviews a Scott Bischke's memoir about completing a Bikram Challenge.

    by Kara-Leah Grant 

    Inspired by Scott Bischke's book Good Camel, Good Life - Finding enlightenment one drop of sweat at a time I took myself off to a Bikram class recently. 

    I haven't been in more than a year, and I was curious.

    The last few classes I attended, I started class feeling calm and sattvic, and I ended class feeling agitated and rajas.

    My mind was busier and louder coming out than it was going in.

    Plus the very last class, I fainted.

    Only for a moment, as I walked out the door, after taking a good long 15 minutes savasana.

    As soon as my butt hit the ground, I came to... with the distinct feeling of being back in my body.

    Result?

    I concluded that right then, Bikram was not the kind of yoga I needed to be doing. It was sending me out of my body, rather than bringing me back in.

    A year later, my yoga practice has shifted and changed, and my ability to be conscious of my own tendencies to leave my body means I was able to stay thoroughly grounded and present for the entire class.

    And damn if I didn't enjoy it.

    It was yet another illustration to me that finding the right yoga for us at the right time is of utmost importance to our journey, and that what this yoga is can shift and change over our lifetime.

    Sometimes it might be Bikram. At other times Astanaga, or Vinyasa Flow, or Kundalini, or none of the Hatha styles at all and instead Bhakti or Karma Yoga.

    However, knowing which yoga is right for us at any given time is the tricky part.

    Often we have fixed ideas about what we like and don't like that have nothing to do with what we need or don't need.

    Plus it's easy to listen to what everybody else has to say about a particular form of Hatha Yoga, like Bikram, or a particular path of yoga, like Bhakti. What's right for them, may not be right for you. Or me.

    Reading Good Camel, Good Life, I was reminded of this.

    Scott does a most excellent job of telling the story of a Bikram Challenge he undertakes during a time when his wife is facing serious illness. He holds lightly to the intertwining threads of his story, moving effortlessly between the day-to-day challenges of his life, and the day-to-day challenges of completing sixty Bikram classes in seventy days.

    For those of us who may think that Bikram Yoga is all about the ego of the body, Scott shows how his practice has an impact on his experience of life in a way that deepens his connection to All That Is. You might call it spirituality even. All the while, he's discerning about aspects of the practice, and the man, that don't sit well with him.

    The heavy commercial overtones of Bikram Yoga bug me.

    The commercialism might even offend my egalitarian side enough to send me looking for another place to practice,  or another activity to undertake. But I choose to set all the outside criticisms and my own concerns aside for a measure that is far more tangible: doing Bikram Choudbury's yoga sequence makes me feel good - physically, mentally, spiritually.

    I have my own evidence that what he teaches is helping me transform into a better person. For me that's enough.

    It's this straight-up style that makes Scott's book so engaging - he's no mindless minion trying to convince anybody of anything, but a thoughtful, insightful man sharing his experience in the hope that it will help someone else find their way, whether to Bikram, or another style of Hatha Yoga.

    He also tosses in loads of background information that sheds some light on who Bikram is and how he operates.

    There's the story of how Richard Nixon gave him a green card after Bikram cured him of thrombophlebitis, the story of his yoga empire, and Bikram's story of the history of yoga. It's all fascinating, and for someone who may never have done yoga and is thinking of going along to class... it's illuminating.

    As is the way that Scott works in much of the Bikram class dialogue throughout each chapter, taking us from the first breathing exercise to the last, and hitting all 26 postures along the way. It's a great technique for structuring the book, and gives awesome insight into the nitty-gritty of a Bikram class.

    Especially if you've never ever done one before.

    So if you've got a loved one you're been trying to get along to a Bikram class for awhile now, maybe buy them a copy of Scott's book.

    It definitely got me back to Bikram, and for that I am grateful.

    I've even gone and bought a concession card again...

    You can check out Scott's Facebook page for Good Camel, Good Life here.

    About Kara-Leah

    Kara-Leah is a writer and yoga teacher who has always been infinitely curious about the make-up of the human psyche and body. Regular yoga helped her heal and recover from chronic back issues, including a spinal fusion at age 16, and two episodes of psychosis at age 29. 

    Her daily home yoga practice began in earnest when people kept asking her to teach them yoga.  She?s since trained as a teacher with Shiva Rea, and immersed herself in practicing, teaching yoga and writing about yoga. Kara-Leah lives just outside of Queenstown, New Zealand with her son Samuel. 

    She?s the publisher of The Yoga Lunchbox and published her first book, Forty Days of Yoga ? Breaking down the barriers to a home yoga practice in 2013. Her second book, The No-More-Excuses Guide to Yogahas just been releasedShe?s also a regular contributor to the Elephant Journal


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  • How to Succeed with Your New Year?s Resolutions

    How to Succeed with Your New Year?s Resolutions

    Our popular contributor Kara-Leah writes about all kinds of things, from home practice and parenting to the etiquettes of yoga class and the ethics of yoga. In this article she writes about the deeper process necessary if we want to make lasting changes in our lives.

    by Kara-Leah Grant 

     

     

    I always try and get up early on New Year?s Day. It?s one of my favourite ways to start the year.

    Early morning, the world seems fresh and alive and ripe for new opportunities and new ways of being. The possibility of new choices and new ways of being seems stronger.

    'How will I live this day?'

    'How will I live this life?'

    On January 1st, this sense of potential and possibility feels even stronger. New Year?s is a time for resolutions, as we make up our minds we?re going to live our lives differently this go around the sun.

    Often though, those resolutions are only a surface desire. We haven't done the hard work of digging into the psyche to find out why we?re making those old choices. By the end of the month, most people?s resolutions are long forgotten, until next New Year?s rolls around.

    Resolving to live life a different way is hard work. It requires presence in each and every moment.

    Every time we make a choice, we must make sure our choice supports the new way we want to live our lives. We must override the part of us that wants to live life the old way.

    It can end up feeling like a battle within. Comfortable status quo versus challenging change.

    But we?ll always be on the losing side of any internal battle. To really win the battle, we have to re-frame it. This is a deeper, more thorough process that looks hard at the reality of our life as it is, helping us understand why we?ve made the choices we have to date.

    This understanding helps us set up our life in a different way so we can make new choices while honouring the part of us that wants to make those old choices.

    This process therefore works to get all parts of us onside. It helps us understand our internal drivers, so there is no battle, just a deep desire to live a new way and a knowing of what?s required to make it happen.

    It?s this process that underpins Forty Days of Yogaa step-by-step exploration of the challenges and obstacles in our busy modern lives to maintaining a home yoga practice.

    And it?s a process I?m intimately knowledgable about. In the last ten years or so I?ve systematically made changes over long periods of time to create the life I want to live.

    That includes practicing yoga every day. It includes clean living. It includes living on purpose, and from my heart with passion. And it includes getting up early on New Year?s Day because I love the way the day feels.

    For a long time, I was afraid of daring to live the life I wanted - a deep-seated, unconscious fear that unknowingly drove many of my choices as I left high school and entered the world.

    It was only taking the final step of moving to the mountains that brought this fear into the light. That meant consciously feeling the fear in every cell of my body - a visceral experience of heart-thumping, stomach-dropping dread.

    Long-buried surfacing fears are like monsters coming up from the deep.

    Until we consciously feel them, we often don?t know they exist, let alone understand they are driving the unconscious choices we make day-to-day in our lives.

    When they arise, as this one did for me the day after I took the ferry to the South Island, leaving my city life for the mountains, they can be terrifying. In this instance - almost two years ago now - I was almost incapacitated, shivering with terror, freaking out and for no discernible cause. My stomach had dropped out, my heart was pounding, and I felt awful.

    Fortunately, all the work I?ve done in the last ten years or so with yoga had prepared me for this moment.

    I could separate out the trigger for these emotions from the emotions themselves.

    I knew the trigger had nothing to do with the fear, and was just an opportunity to release something I?d kept buried and hidden for decades. Instead of wasting time and energy trying to control the trigger and make it different so I wouldn?t feel the terror, I focused on staying with the sensations in my body.

    It worked.

    The arising fear dissipated and left insight in it?s wake.

    When we make new choices in our lives - like for New Year?s resolutions, or committing to Forty Days of Yoga - we?re unshackling these deep-seated fears that have been unconsciously running our lives. We?re creating space and opportunity for them to surface.

    For many of us, this process is unfamiliar and terrifying. We don?t know it, but we?re not ready to deal with the depths of our feelings. A week into our new choices, we sabotage ourselves so we can drop back into the familiar and keep those fears safely locked away in the basement of our psyche.

    Then we berate ourselves for our lack of discipline and willpower.

    But making lasting changes in our lives is not about discipline and willpower.

    It?s about understanding process, applying awareness, supporting ourselves, and having the courage to face the unknown. It?s about understanding how the old ways of being have served a need and kept us safe.

    The reason I've been able to learn and work with this process is my commitment to daily yoga practice. It has been the cornerstone of consistent committed change in my life.

    Practicing yoga daily gives us time and space to observe ourselves in action. Through observation of ourselves we can begin to see our patterns of behaviour. Seeing patterns of behaviour points helps us to identify underlying beliefs and fears - the beliefs and fears that sabotage our desires for a different life.

    Daily yoga practice also teaches us to stay steady in the face of uncomfortable sensation. We learn that when we breathe into the discomfort it often melts away. We discover that sensations which we?ve always run from are bearable. That which becomes bearable is able to be felt. That which is felt is released. That which is released is healed.

    Our unconscious fear which has kept us shackled in our old ways of being, has been felt, embraced, released and healed.

    Now we?re able to make deep, long-lasting changes in the foundation of our being.

    As a result, our lives change naturally.

    This has been my experience over the last ten years or so, and this is what I share in Forty Days of Yoga. New Year?s may have been and gone, but time to make a new choice exists in every moment.

    What will you choose to create this year? What new choices will you make?

    About Kara-Leah

    Kara-Leah is a writer and yoga teacher who has always been infinitely curious about the make-up of the human psyche and body. Regular yoga helped her heal and recover from chronic back issues, including a spinal fusion at age 16, and two episodes of psychosis at age 29. 

    Her daily home yoga practice began in earnest when people kept asking her to teach them yoga.  She?s since trained as a teacher with Shiva Rea, and immersed herself in practicing, teaching yoga and writing about yoga. Kara-Leah lives just outside of Queenstown, New Zealand with her son Samuel. 

    She?s the publisher of The Yoga Lunchbox and published her first book, Forty Days of Yoga ? Breaking down the barriers to a home yoga practice in 2013. Her second book, The No-More-Excuses Guide to Yogahas just been releasedShe?s also a regular contributor to the Elephant Journal

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    4. Why It’s Important to be Flexible with Your Yoga Practice
    5. How Daily Yoga Practice can Revolutionise Society
  • How the Beauty of Nature helps us Realise our True Nature

    How the Beauty of Nature helps us Realise our True Nature

    Welcome to a new article by our regular contributor, Dr. Bina Nangia. Dr. Nangia is a long-time spiritual seeker who works with children.

     

    When we talk of existence, only what is natural comes to our mind. Nature is existence. In the midst of nature we can experience our own nature - that which is whole, complete and total. A walk in nature teaches us so many lessons we need to learn and unlearn. 

    The trees standing tall, with leaves swaying in the wind, can teach us determination. Quietly, as if watching with intensity, the happenings of the day. Not being affected, simply watching. We can learn an important lesson of ?witnessing? events, situations as they unfold before us.

    The wind moves smoothly between the leaves of the trees. The leaves move gently, happily not affecting the wholesomeness of the trees. Our thoughts can move smoothly within us, not affecting our total being. 

    Oneness and a sense of belonging can be learnt from trees standing side by side. Total acceptance of each other, with a non judgmental attitude. Birds flying in and out, sitting comfortably on them. Unaffected, yet accommodating. In our lives we are mostly judgmental, non accepting and accommodating seems farfetched. 

    Giving, without expecting in return, can be learnt from trees and the shade they give. To everyone, irrespective of colour, caste or creed they only give, unasked. Watching the sun rise amidst nature, reminds us to be warm, bright and giving, with no questions asked. 

    Nature is wonderment.

    When you see parrots and squirrels eating together, unconcerned about rights, you can only wonder.

    The greatest miracle is a human. Perfect co-ordination, more perfect than any human made computer.

    Just that we have forgotten to appreciate this wonderful piece of equipment and take it for granted.

    From a blade of grass to huge trees and foliage of all kinds, existence manifests in full capacity. Every tree, flower, fruit interconnected to the whole, is complete, total and whole. Perfect cyclic representation of perfect existence.

    So spend time with nature to re-connect, remember existence, feel whole and be in total awareness and gratitude.

     About Dr. Bina Nangia

     

    Dr. Nangia currently works with special kids. This is her calling and she has been working in this field for 20 years.

    A grandmother of two boys, Dr. Nangia has been practising yoga since her younger days. Her keen interest in spirituality over many years has got her in touch with many masters. They have contributed to her growth tremendously. She shares her thoughts in magazines and newspaper articles.

    Dr. Nangia is the author of Dyslexia Decoded, a handbook for special educators, which was recently published by Penguin and Hayhouse.

    She shares her experiences about special education on various social networking sites, and is a trained therapist and family networker.

    Dr. Nangia lives in Delhi, India. 

    Connect w/ Anmol

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  • Free Your Pelvis and the Spine will Follow: Four Explorations to Relieve Back Pain

    Free Your Pelvis and the Spine will Follow: Four Explorations to Relieve Back Pain

    Our popular contributor Kara-Leah writes about all kinds of things, from home practice and parenting to the etiquettes of yoga class and the ethics of yoga. In this article she details ways to explore your body through your yoga practice that help to free the pelvis, and therefore the spine.

    by Kara-Leah Grant 

     

    Years of yoga practice and yoga teaching has taught me that our ability to freely move our pelvis is a key aspect to unlocking our spines, and releasing any chronic low back issues or holding patterns.

    I've also learned that it's not always the muscles, ligaments and tendons that are locking our pelvis in place. It can be our minds.

    Yes, the psyche can affect the way that our pelvis moves. Fortunately, over time, yoga practice can unlock both the physical body and the psyche, significantly improving the movement of our pelvis. In doing so, it can free our spine, and reduce lower back and hip issues.

    There are a few tricks and tips I've learned along the way that can make this process easier, faster, and less frustrating. I encourage you to take these tips and tricks and play with them. Try them out on your body, test them out in your practice, and see what arises for you, and what works best for you.

    My understanding of the body is experiential, and I've learned mostly by observation and practice. Along the way, I had some inspirational teachers share aspects of practice that have made an enormous difference to my practice.

    When I started yoga, I'd been diagnosed with degenerative disc disease, I'd had a spinal fusion about 9 years previous, I was living with chronic sciatic pain and a spasming back, and my right foot was half numb, meaning I walked with a limp.

    I'm now pain free, limp free, and best of all, I understand my body from the inside out. That means if my back does ever start to talk to me through pain, I know what it's saying, and what I need to do.

    The journey to wholeness and healing is personal, and it starts when we take 100% responsibility for our experience. That means while we can ask other people for input and advice, we can't expect them to solve our problems, or heal us. We have to do the hard work ourselves.

    If you're having back issues, and you're ready to take 100% responsibility for your experience, and you're willing to do the hard yards on getting to know your body form the inside out, it's likely you'll be able to make positive changes.

    Here's some places to start. These are the 'Ah-a!' moments I've had along the way on my journey to a healthy spine. Read, understand, and then play.

    1. Tuning into the ascending and descending breaths

    A few years after I'd been practicing yoga, I caught sight of myself in Mountain Pose (a simple standing pose). To my horror, I looked like the Leaning Tower of Pisa. All my weight was forward over my heels. I was fleeing the back of my body and pushing forward into the future. A-ha!

    Exploration: Stand sideways in front of a mirror without looking at it and find your normal stance. Now look sideways. Where does your weight sit? Forward over the balls of your feet? Or back over the heels?

    Gently rock forward and back with your eyes closed and see if you can come to a middle point. Does it feel different? Look in the mirror again. Now where are you standing?

    If you're not already weighted even between the front and backs of your feet, find that middle ground and breath into it. Experience it. What does it feel like? Notice everything there is to notice - physical sensations, thought arising in the mind, feelings moving through and any energetic sensations.

    As you breathe, imagine you're drawing the breath up the front of the body on the inhale. Exhale down the back of the body through the sitting bones, the middle of the leg bones, the heels and into the ground.

    Keep doing this breath over and over, what does it feel like? Does the breath easily rise up the front of the body? What does it feel like exhaling down into the ground through the heels?

    Working with this made me realise that I wasn't trusting my back to support me - and that I didn't feel supported by life. It made me realise how intensely I was gripping the front of my body so I didn't fall forward with my front-heavy stance. It made me realise how ungrounded I felt without my heels properly weighted into the ground.

    What does this exploration make you realise?

    2. Gripping, clenching and holding - it's all in your head

    Over years of practice, I've deduced that I've been gripping, clenching and holding myself against life. This gripping, clenching and holding has extended to the stomach, hips, and lower back. My back would often get worse in times of stress, and this was why. As I got stressed, I would resist life. That resistance would led to gripping, clenching and holding in the body. That holding would cause pain.

    Now, if my hips or back are ever painful, I'm able to bring my awareness to that area, and release any gripping, clenching or holding. Invariably the pain melts away. This is subtle work that has taken me years of practice to tune into - it's never too early to start.

    Exploration: Lie on your back in savasana (corpse pose). Place your hands on the front of your hips. Breath into your hands. Imagine your hips softening, melting, releasing and letting go. With every exhale, soften another millimetre or two.

    Shift your hands to your lower belly and do the same. The upper belly.

    Release your hands at your side, lying them palm-face up beside you. Bring your awareness to your lower back. Notice if it's curved away from the ground, or lying flat on the ground. If it's curved away from the ground, bend your knees until it lies flat. It's likely that your hip flexors are gripping at the front and causing the pelvis to tilt forward, creating the curve in the lower back.

    Now that your spine is flat against the ground, and you've brought your full awareness to the lower back, breath into the area. If you need to, use your imagination. Notice the contact point where your spine mets the floor. Imagine your spine is melting into the floor with every exhale. Stay here for ten minutes or more, melting down into the ground, through the ground, becoming part of the ground.

    Over time, bringing greater and greater awareness to my hips, back and belly, I could sense when I was starting to grip against life. I could practice breathing and softening that area immediately. The key is to build up a level of body awareness so you can catch yourself in the grip, and breath your way into the soft.

    3. Channeling the flow

    The next break through came courtesy of Shiva Rea. She uses a technique in her Vinyasa Flow Yoga called Pulsation Vinyasa - micro-movements of the pelvis in alignment with the breath. As I worked with this method, I noticed that I couldn't breathe through my hip joints - they were damned up, stuck and stagnant.

    If I did a wide-legged squat without pulsation vinyasa, I noticed that my habitual gripping, clenching and holding patterns meant I was gripping, holding and clenching my hips and pelvis in order to hold myself up... but this was preventing me from releasing into the pose.

    When I used Shiva's technique of pulsation vinyasa within wide-legged squat, the micro-movement with the breath meant I wasn't able to do my usual grip, clench and hold. I could feel the muscles and prana supporting me, while the hips and pelvis softened and released into the posture.

    This showed me that I was often gripping, clenching and holding my body within postures in such a way as to counter-act the very opening that was meant to be happening. Knowing I had this tendency, I started to use the micro-movements in the pelvis whenever I suspected I was working against myself. It's worked wonders.

    Exploration: Stand with your legs wide, feet at 45 degrees, knee caps lined up over second toe. As you inhale, press firmly down against the ground through your feet, particular the heels. Feel the breath rise up the central channel of the spine. As you exhale, release down into a squat. Keep the hips above the knees - in fact, keep the hips relatively high.

    From this moderate wide-legged squat position, press firmly down through the legs, extend your tailbone down towards the ground and draw the breath up through the front of the pelvis. As you take this inhale, the pelvis is tucking under slightly - I prefer to say extend the tailbone down towards the ground rather than tuck it under as it's more accurate.

    As you exhale, release the pelvis forward slightly and sink a millimetre or two deeper into the squat, still pressing firmly through the feet.

    Repeat a few times, focusing on where the breath goes in the body. As you inhale, can you draw the breath up from the feet, through the leg bones, through the hip joints, into the pelvis and up the spine?

    Watch: Video of this wide-legged yoga squat exploration.

    My major 'A-ha!' moment came when I discovered I could breath through the hip joints - suddenly I could feel space and freedom that had never before existed in that part of my body. Freeing the hip joints has had a major impact on my lower back.

    4. Combo meal deal

    Once you begin to tune into the ways in which you grip, clench and hold, and tune into the ways in which you can feel the flow, you can start to put it all together.

    Exploration: Bring yourself into Legs-up-the-wall. Your legs go straight up a wall, your spine is flat against the ground. If your hamstring are tight, you may need to push your hips away from the wall, resting your legs an angle against it. The angle of the legs against the wall doesn't matter. What matters is finding ease with straight legs and a relaxed spine.

    Bring body awareness into your pelvis, and breath into the area. Imagine there's a large balloon in your pelvis and as you inhale you're blowing up the balloon. Where does the inhale go?

    Tune into your spine, and where it touches the ground. On every exhale, melt it down into the ground, and through the ground.

    Tune into your legs. Inhale and expand the balloon inside your pelvis, exhale from the centre of your pelvis, through the hips joints, down the middle of the leg bones and out the heels towards the sky. Do this repeatedly. Notice any blockages, dark places, tension or denseness. Stay present and aware, be curious about your experience.

    Explore the micro-movements of the pelvis in tandom with the breath. What happens when you inhale and press the top & back of your pelvis firmly against the ground? What happens when you exhale and release your pelvis into a forward tilt, feeling your tailbone against the ground? Do this repeatedly with the breath.

    Bring the legs out wide, and explore here. How does this change things? Rotate your legs externally. What does that feel like? Rotate your legs internally. Find the middle point. Be curious. Listen to your body's intuition in the exploration.

    Use your hands underneath your thighs to bring your knees into your chest. Press your feet firmly against the wall, and your pelvis firmly against the ground. Breath into your hips joints and lower spine. What does that feel like?

    There's something about breathing into the pelvis, through the joints, and out the legs which helps release the tension accumulating in my spine. How does it feel in your spine?

    Over time, with awareness of my body and breath, these techniques have helped me release tension in the lower back, hips and pelvis.

    May they trigger a similar release for you, and further explorations and 'a-ha!' moments.

    Remember, it's your body, your journey. Go within with full presence, and let your own body's infinite wisdom guide you.

    About Kara-Leah

    Kara-Leah is a writer and yoga teacher who has always been infinitely curious about the make-up of the human psyche and body. Regular yoga helped her heal and recover from chronic back issues, including a spinal fusion at age 16, and two episodes of psychosis at age 29. 

    Her daily home yoga practice began in earnest when people kept asking her to teach them yoga.  She?s since trained as a teacher with Shiva Rea, and immersed herself in practicing, teaching yoga and writing about yoga. Kara-Leah lives just outside of Queenstown, New Zealand with her son Samuel. 

    She?s the publisher of The Yoga Lunchbox and published her first book, Forty Days of Yoga ? Breaking down the barriers to a home yoga practice in 2013. Her second book, The No-More-Excuses Guide to Yogahas just been releasedShe?s also a regular contributor to the Elephant Journal 

     

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  • How to Transcend Loneliness

    How to Transcend Loneliness

    Welcome to a new article by our regular contributor, Dr. Bina Nangia. Dr. Nangia is a long-time spiritual seeker who works with children.

     

    When was the last time you were ?alone??

    Do you always feel the need to be surrounded by people and events?

    What does ?to be alone? mean?

    We as people, always relate to everything and everyone to complete ourselves. There is a tremendous feeling of incompleteness, a void which constantly needs to be full, complete. It is like a depression in the middle of the sea, which is always trying to fill itself from the surrounding waters.

    Our idea of completeness is not to feel lonely, so we are constantly seeking things, beings and experiences to make us feel whole. There is fear to be on our own to face ourselves.

    The negative emotions which we carry within our minds scare us when looked at them in the face. So in order to avoid this direct interaction with ourselves we would fill our loneliness and avoid being alone.

    Yet it is a great opportunity to be alone and face our minds, because as soon as we can do this the mind expands, we can learn to go beyond mind and challenge our beliefs, conditionings.

    When we can overcome the fears of facing ourselves, the need to complete the incompleteness disappears and in its place there is expansion. This limitlessness is what we have been always looking for. The mind is the barrier and it can be transcended. However some things sound easier said than done. This requires immense practise, dispassion and letting go.

    Once this ?zone? of facing ourselves is reached, it becomes our second nature to enjoy being alone.

    Loneliness is the restricted mind, while aloneness is the transcended mind.

    Conversations with the mind help it to face itself without judgement or criticism. Watching its various perceptions we learn how to distance ourselves from identification with good or bad. The alone time is a useful practise. 

    Loneliness is often due to our attachments and involvements with other beings and situations. When these attachments fail to get us the expected results, the mind is confused, restless and feels incomplete. We tend look around for other beings, objects and events to fill this void.

    Being an actor, playing various roles with a sense of detachment and witnessing the play of our minds is to be alone.

    When the fear of facing ourselves disappears, we look forward to our alone time.

    Just like our body muscles need to be constantly worked on, to get its optimum working capacity, so also our mind needs to be worked on to make it our friend.

    In the hustle and bustle of everyday life and its dramas, alone time must be kept aside to reconnect, rediscover our true full nature.

    The more we practise being alone, loneliness becomes a thing of the past and life is more meaningful, peaceful and happy.

    So give yourself permission to be alone and transcend loneliness.

     About Dr. Bina Nangia

     

    Dr. Nangia currently works with special kids. This is her calling and she has been working in this field for 20 years.

    A grandmother of two boys, Dr. Nangia has been practising yoga since her younger days. Her keen interest in spirituality over many years has got her in touch with many masters. They have contributed to her growth tremendously. She shares her thoughts in magazines and newspaper articles.

    Dr. Nangia is the author of Dyslexia Decoded, a handbook for special educators, which was recently published by Penguin and Hayhouse.

    She shares her experiences about special education on various social networking sites, and is a trained therapist and family networker.

    Dr. Nangia lives in Delhi, India.

    Connect w/ Anmol

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