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  • International Business Times
  • ?The Exorcist? Season 2 Casts Li Jun Li As Social Worker Rose

    ?The Exorcist? Season 2 Casts Li Jun Li As Social Worker Rose
    ?The Exorcist? Season 2 just cast Li Jun Li as a series regular. According to Deadline, Li will play the role of a social worker named Rose. She is assigned to tend to the children in Andrew Kim?s (John Cho) foster home. The very organized Rose will arrive at the foster home to check if Andrew can still take good care of the kids who are under his care.
  • ?Westworld? Season 2 Spoilers: Creators Tease Samurai Or ?Shogun? World

    ?Westworld? Season 2 Spoilers: Creators Tease Samurai Or ?Shogun? World
    In Season 1 of ?Westworld,? all fans got to see was the Western theme park and the operating offices of Delos. But Season 2 will take viewers out of the park and into the real world. Show creators Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy even said that they are entertaining the idea of creating another world filled with hosts, and it might materialize in the seasons to come. READ: Will hosts gain control of the park in ?Westworld? Season 2?
  • ?Supergirl? Spoilers: Kara Faces Off Against Mystery Villain In New Set Photos

    ?Supergirl? Spoilers: Kara Faces Off Against Mystery Villain In New Set Photos
    ?Supergirl? star Melissa Benoist was spotted filming a scene opposite an unidentified character in New Westminster, Canada on Wednesday.
  • Abby Lee Miller Wants Credit For Maddie Ziegler?s Success Post-?Dance Moms?

    Abby Lee Miller Wants Credit For Maddie Ziegler?s Success Post-?Dance Moms?
    Former ?Dance Moms? coach Abby Lee Miller wants to be recognized as someone who was instrumental for Maddie Ziegler?s success in Hollywood. Miller also claims that she?s been a mother figure to Sia?s music video muse.
  • ?Gotham? Season 4 Spoilers: Will The Joker Make Another Comeback?

    ?Gotham? Season 4 Spoilers: Will The Joker Make Another Comeback?
    The Joker (Cameron Monaghan) already died in ?Gotham,? but he was resurrected by his faithful followers in Season 3. Before he can cause any more trouble, however, his shenanigans were put to an abrupt stop after he kidnapped Bruce Wayne (David Mazouz) and was captured by the cops. For Season 4, will the villain make another huge comeback? As far as executive producer John Stephens is concerned, he definitely will, given his current place of confinement.
  • FOX Business
  • Volkswagen earnings rise in stronger European economy

    Volkswagen earnings rise in stronger European economy
    Volkswagen has reported higher profits for the first half of the year as the company benefited from increased sales in the growing European economy and moved past one-time costs for its diesel emissions scandal in the U.S. After-tax profit rose to 6.6 billion euros ($7.7 billion) from 3.6 billion euros in the same period in 2016, when the company had more than 2 billion euros in charges related to its diesel troubles.
  • Repsol earnings rise on higher production, efficiencies

    Repsol earnings rise on higher production, efficiencies
    Spanish energy company Repsol says new oil and gas findings and reforms to improve efficiency drove a 65.3-percent increase in net profit in the first half of the year.
  • Trump announces $10 billion Foxconn plant in Wisconsin

    Trump announces $10 billion Foxconn plant in Wisconsin
    President Donald Trump says that electronics giant Foxconn will build a $10 billion factory in Wisconsin that's expected to initially create 3,000 jobs, the largest economic development project in state history.
  • Airbus profits lag amid engine issues, military challenges

    Airbus profits lag amid engine issues, military challenges
    Airbus' first-half profits took a hit amid ongoing problems with its A400M military transporter and engine problems for its A320neo, and deliveries are down though orders are on the rise.
  • Profit soars for brewer AB Inbev after merger with SABMiller

    Profit soars for brewer AB Inbev after merger with SABMiller
    Anheuser-Busch InBev, the world's largest brewer, says its net profit soared to $1.5 billion (1.28 billion euros) in the second quarter of 2017 from $152 million (129 million euros) in the same period a year earlier, before its merger with rival SABMiller.
 
 
  • The Economist: Finance and economics
  • Reform of China?s ailing state-owned firms is emboldening them

    Reform of China?s ailing state-owned firms is emboldening them

    ACCORDING to company lore, Yunnan Baiyao, a musty-smelling medical powder, played a vital role during the Long March. As China?s Communist troops fled from attacks in the 1930s, trekking thousands of miles to a new base, they spread its yellow granules on their wounds to stanch bleeding. To this day, instructions on the Yunnan Baiyao bottle recommend application after being shot or stabbed. Many Chinese households keep some in stock to deal with more run-of-the-mill cuts. But the government has recently put its maker into service to treat a different kind of ailment: the financial weakness of state-owned enterprises (SOEs).

    Yunnan Baiyao has emerged as a poster-child of China?s new round of SOE reform. The company, previously owned by the south-western province of Yunnan, sold a 50% stake to a private investor earlier this year. The same firm had tried to buy a slice of Yunnan Baiyao in 2009 but was blocked. Its success this time has been held up in the official press as proof that...

  • The power of populists

    The power of populists

    WITH the defeat of Marine Le Pen in her bid for the French presidency, establishment politicians in rich countries breathed a sigh of relief. The fortunes of extremist candidates have faltered since the populist surge that put Donald Trump into the White House. But it is hard to be confident that this was populism?s high-water mark without a better understanding of what caused the swell in the first place. The most convincing explanations suggest that populist upswings are not in the past.

    It is tempting to dismiss the rise of radicalism as an inevitable after-effect of the global financial crisis. Studies show that the vote shares of extreme parties, particularly on the right, tend to increase in the years after a crisis. The Depression spawned some of the 20th century?s most dangerous and radical populist movements. But the facts do not fit that story precisely. In Europe, for example, populist parties have steadily won more voters since the 1980s. What is more, populist rage is...

  • Regulating credit unions in Africa

    Regulating credit unions in Africa

    Striking a co-operative note

    THE most recent time Moses Kibet Biegon needed a quick loan was when his roof blew away. He got one from the Imarisha Savings and Credit Co-operative, in Kericho in western Kenya. Imarisha channels the savings of its 57,000 members into loans for school fees, business projects or, in Mr Biegon?s case, roof repairs. It runs a fund to help with medical bills. And it pays dividends to its members from its investments, which include a shopping plaza that it opened last year.

    Savings and credit co-operatives (SACCOs) like Imarisha are the African version of credit unions: member-owned co-ops, usually organised around a community or workplace. Some are rural self-help groups with a few dozen members and a safe. Others have branch networks and mobile apps. The largest SACCOs rival banks; Mwalimu National, which serves Kenyan teachers, has even bought one.

    The co-operative model brings ?a more humane face? to finance,...

  • KKR, a private-equity giant, lays out its succession plan

    KKR, a private-equity giant, lays out its succession plan

    IN MOST four-decade-old firms run by greying co-founders, investors would have long since demanded clarity on succession. But private equity works differently: the industry has been dominated by its pioneers ever since its origins in the 1970s. So an announcement on July 17th about its future leadership by KKR, one of the world?s largest private-equity firms, puts it a step ahead of its rivals. Its aim of ensuring that the firm has the right structure in place ?for decades to come? is not obviously shared across the industry.

    KKR has been run since 1976 by two of its founders, Henry Kravis and George Roberts (both in their early 70s). They are staying on as co-chairmen and co-chief executives but with less of a day-to-day role. Lining up behind them are a pair of 40-somethings, Joe Bae and Scott Nuttall, who will join the board and take the titles of co-president and co-chief operating officer.

    Such explicit, public succession planning is unusual. Stephen...

  • Could bond funds break the market?

    Could bond funds break the market?

    GOOD generals know that the next war will be fought with different weapons and tactics from the last. Similarly, financial regulators are right to worry that the next crisis may not resemble the credit crunch of 2007-08.

    The last crisis arose from the interaction between the market for mortgage-backed securities and the banking system. As investors became unsure of the banks? exposure to bad debts, they cut back on their lending to the sector, causing a liquidity squeeze. Since then, central banks have insisted that commercial banks improve their capital ratios to ensure they are less vulnerable.

    Might the next crisis originate not in the banking system, but in the bond market? That is the subject of a new paper* from the Bank of England. The worry centres on the ?liquidity mismatch? between mutual funds, which offer instant redemption to their clients, and the corporate-bond market, where many securities may be hard to trade in a crisis. The danger is that forced...