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  • International Business Times
  • ?Agents Of SHIELD? Star Henry Simmons Will Be Heartbroken If Coulson Dies

    ?Agents Of SHIELD? Star Henry Simmons Will Be Heartbroken If Coulson Dies
    It seems the ?Marvel?s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.? cast still doesn?t know if Coulson will die. In a birthday message for co-star Henry Simmons, Coulson actor Clark Gregg continued to hint that he might not be back on the show, much to Simmon?s dismay.
  • LeBron James Contract: What The Lakers Will Pay The NBA's Best Player In 2018, 2019, 2020

    LeBron James Contract: What The Lakers Will Pay The NBA's Best Player In 2018, 2019, 2020
    LeBron James? decision to leave the Cleveland Cavaliers for the Los Angeles Lakers wasn?t about just next season. The NBA?s best player plans to be in L.A. for the long haul. James agreed to sign a four-year contract worth $153.3 million, according to reports. He?s got a player option for the final year of the deal, meaning he?ll be with the Lakers through at least the 2020-2021 NBA season.
  • Did Iran Attempt To Assassinate Donald Trump's Lawyer Rudy Giuliani?

    Did Iran Attempt To Assassinate Donald Trump's Lawyer Rudy Giuliani?
    BRUSSELS - An Iranian diplomat has been arrested along with two people suspected of plotting a bomb attack on a meeting of an exiled Iranian opposition group in France, Belgian authorities said on Monday. U.S President Donald Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani and several former European and Arab ministers were among those attending the meeting of the Paris-based National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI).
  • Teacher Accused Of Sexual Assault, Hypnotizing Students And Making Them Call Him 'Master'

    Teacher Accused Of Sexual Assault, Hypnotizing Students And Making Them Call Him 'Master'
    A former Pennsylvania elementary school teacher has been accused of having inappropriate contact with five female students. James William Mentzer, 39, of Hummelstown, Pennsylvania, was charged on Thursday with institutional sexual assault, unlawful contact with a minor, indecent assault, and corruption of minors after a four-month investigation.
  • Facebook Reveals More Than 50 Hardware Data Partnerships In Document

    Facebook Reveals More Than 50 Hardware Data Partnerships In Document
    Social media giant Facebook has spent most of 2018 fighting off accusations of data misuse, and a document released over the weekend will not stem that tide. Facebook gave hundreds of pages worth of answers to the House Energy and Commerce Committee on Friday night, which notably featured a full list of every hardware maker that previously had extensive access to Facebook user data.
 
 
  • The Economist: Finance and economics
  • Mini-grids could be a boon to poor people in Africa and Asia

    Mini-grids could be a boon to poor people in Africa and Asia

    A FORESTED village in Jharkhand state, eastern India, Narotoli is home mainly to adherents of Sarna, a nature-worshipping tribal religion. In more ways than one, it has long been off-grid. Drive past a police checkpoint a few miles away and you are in territory loyal to ?the guys?, a euphemism for Maoist guerrillas. That makes Narotoli more marginalised than most places. A few months ago it became one of the last in India to benefit from a push by Narendra Modi, the prime minister, to supply electricity to all the country?s villages. But the power lines are so ?reliably unreliable?, says an Indian executive, that they might as well be washing lines.

    Two years before the grid arrived, however, Mlinda, a social enterprise, had set up a ?mini-grid?, a bank of batteries charged by solar panels and hooked up to homes, to guarantee round-the-clock power independent of the national network. Mini-grids are different from the rooftop solar panels and batteries (sometimes linked up in ?micro-grids?)...

  • Donald Trump insists on trade reciprocity. But what kind?

    Donald Trump insists on trade reciprocity. But what kind?

    IN THE sixth episode of ?The Apprentice?, a reality-television show first broadcast in 2004, Donald Trump, as always, fired a contestant vying for a job in his company. She was, he said, the worst negotiator. And she had failed to fight back when belittled by her teammate. The episode was entitled ?Tit For Tat?.

    That same principle of reciprocity guides Mr Trump?s trade policy as president. And it is animating his tariff war with China. On July 6th America imposed 25% duties on Chinese imports worth about $34bn. (Another $16bn-worth will be hit in due course.) China responded by slapping tariffs on a similar amount of American goods (including a cargo of soyabeans aboard the Peak Pegasus that arrived at the port of Dalian mere hours later).

    The two sides disagree, however, about which is tit and which tat. China believes it is responding dollar-for-dollar to American aggression. But America too believes it is retaliating: punishing China for trade and...

  • Development-impact bonds are costly, cumbersome?and good

    Development-impact bonds are costly, cumbersome?and good

    IF A girl in a poor country goes to school, she will probably have a more comfortable life than if she stays at home. She will be less likely to marry while still a child, and therefore less likely to die in childbirth. So, not surprisingly, there is an Indian charity that tries to get girls into school and ensure they learn something, and there are Western philanthropists willing to pay for its work. What is noteworthy is how they have gone about this transaction.

    On July 13th the Brookings Institution, a think-tank, presents the results of the world?s first large development-impact bond, which paid for girls? education in the northern Indian state of Rajasthan. In this novel way of funding charitable work, a financial institution gives money to a charity, which tries to achieve various specified outcomes. If a neutral arbiter rules that it has succeeded, a donor or philanthropist repays the investor, plus a bonus. If it fails, the investor loses some or all of its money.

    This...

  • Why the euro zone hasn?t seen more cross-border bank mergers

    Why the euro zone hasn?t seen more cross-border bank mergers

    MERGERS of euro-area banks from different countries, a banker jokes, are ?very much like teenage sex. There?s a lot of talk, but little action. And when it does happen, there?s a lot of disappointment.? In recent months gossip has linked each of France?s three biggest banks (BNP Paribas, Crédit Agricole and Société Générale), as well as UniCredit, Italy?s largest, with Commerzbank, Germany?s second-biggest listed bank. Lately chatter has connected UniCredit and Société Générale. But no big, cross-border takeover is imminent.

    A stream of deals in the 2000s?notably UniCredit?s purchase of HypoVereinsbank, another leading German lender, in 2005?has slowed to a trickle (see chart, top panel). Policymakers at both the European Commission and the European Central Bank (ECB) would like the flow to revive. The euro area?s banking markets are still essentially national ones. ?European banking remains as fragmented today as it was in 2012,? notes Magdalena Stoklosa of Morgan Stanley. Domestic...

  • Is North Korea the next Vietnam? Don?t count on it

    Is North Korea the next Vietnam? Don?t count on it

    AS AMERICA presses North Korea to abandon nuclear weapons, it has pointed to Vietnam as an example of the prosperity that awaits the isolated state. ?It can be your miracle in North Korea as well,? Mike Pompeo (pictured), the secretary of state, said on July 8th, on a visit to Hanoi. It is not the first time Vietnam has been held up as a model for North Korea. Over the years, officials from the two countries have discussed lessons from Vietnam?s reforms. North Korea sees Vietnam as less threatening than China and more of a peer, making it a more welcome mentor. But North Korea?s economic path is likely to be more fraught.

    Yes, there are similarities. Like North Korea?s economy today, Vietnam?s used to be largely collectivised. The Vietnamese Communist party?s ability to retain power at the same time as freeing markets must appeal to Kim Jong Un, North Korea?s dictator, who has vowed to improve his country?s economy. In 1985, on the eve of Vietnam?s doi moi...