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  • Putting Together a Reality Team

    Putting Together a Reality Team

    Fantasy baseball has been a popular pastime for 30 years. Unfortunately, there tends to be too much "fantasy" and not enough dealing with the nitty-gritty reality of what it takes to fill a well-rounded roster at the major league level. Depending on how drafts are arranged (such as just 12 or 14 owners picking from both leagues), the fantasy baseball process can lend itself to assembling a collection of higher-level players rather than a 25-man roster of diverse talents and skill levels, and defense is seldom (if ever) factored into the equation.

    Baseball addicts have it much easier between seasons in the 21st century than what our fathers and grandfathers endured. ESPN, MLB.com, MILB.com, SI.com and team web sites provide almost limitless information as compared to the agate type in the transactions section of the daily newspaper and the weekly hot stove league fix from The Sporting News that provided meager winter rations of baseball information for nearly a century.

    Need something to do besides staring at a computer screen until spring training begins? Here's a way to recognize your favorite players of all time and put together a roster that is much closer to the big league norm than a typical fantasy league squad.

    The rules are simple. One Hall of Famer (already inducted or a future sure thing such as Greg Maddux) is allowed per team. You can't have five aces in the starting rotation, an outfield of Willie Mays, Babe Ruth and Ted Williams or perennial All-Stars at every infield position. Back of the rotation starters, middle relievers, utility players and extra outfielders in real life will assume those roles on every team. You may choose anyone who appeared in a major league game from the 1800s to the present. A few extra reserves can be added to the list as a AAA roster of sorts, but going beyond 25 players isn't required.

    It's going to be natural to try and put together the best possible team, but that isn't the main point of the reality baseball game. This is a pleasant mental exercise and a way to remember favorite players - especially those who aren't big names.

    The pitching staff is by far the most flexible part of the process. Go with as few as nine arms if you like complete games and dead-ball era workhorses, or do your best Tony LaRussa impersonation and have a 13-man staff complete with two LOOGYs. Since I'm in favor of complete games and four-man rotations, my ace is one of the most durable starters of the live ball era.

    Mickey Lolich may have looked out of shape and often joked about his hefty build, but few pitchers exhibited the endurance the Tigers left-hander displayed. Number 29 had four consecutive seasons with at least 308 innings pitched from 1971 to 1974 along with 96 complete games in that span. Lolich's 376 IP in 1971 is the highest total in the majors since 1917 by a conventional (knuckleballer Wilbur Wood soft-tossed 376.2 innings in 1972) pitcher.

    Cut 376 innings in half (188), and you have a typical season for many 21st century starters. Lolich's other 1971 numbers - 45 starts, 29 complete games, 8.36 innings per start and a 25-14 record - look downright freakish by current standards. Best known for his three complete game victories against the Cardinals in the 1968 World Series, the self-described "fat man's hero" also performed well in his only other postseason experience.

    Lolich started a pair of games in the 1972 American League Championship Series against the A's. Despite giving up just three earned runs in 19 IP (1.42 ERA), his record was 0-1. Lolich finished with a 217-191 career record and 3.44 ERA. His 2679 strikeouts in the American League are the most by an AL lefty.

    Brief stints with the Mets and Padres bumped the career strikeouts to 2832, a number that was in the all-time top 10 when Lolich retired in 1978. Combine the Ks with just 2.7 walks per 9 innings, exceptional stamina and an impressive track record in the clutch, and I'm more than happy to pick Lolich as my workhorse and ace.

    Rick Reuschel is another innings eater with a large frame, but don't let his physique fool you. "Big Daddy" was an agile, sure-handed fielder who won Gold Gloves in 1985 and 1987, and the sinkerball had enough foot speed and baserunning instincts to have been used as a pinch-runner on several occasions.

    Like Mariano Rivera, Reuschel was the rare hurler who could successfully throw one pitch in many different ways. When his sinker was on, the infielders had plenty of action gobbling up grounders. A quiet man not given to lengthy interviews, Reuschel described his idea of a perfect game as "27 pitches, 27 grounders."

    Career totals of 214-191 and a 3.37 ERA are virtually identical to Lolich, but Reuschel's ERA+ of 114 tops Lolich's 104. A stingy 935 walks in 3548.1 IP works out to less than 2.4 per 9 innings. The right-hander is remembered for his 17-8. 2.94 ERA performance at age 40 for the pennant-winning 1989 Giants, but he had two other seasons that were even better.

    A 20-10, 2.79 ERA (158 + ERA) effort with the Cubs in 1977 along with a 14-8 2.27 (4th in the NL) in 1985 with the Pirates are the high points on Reuschel's resume. The 1985 campaign was especially noteworthy, as Reuschel was coming back from arm injuries at age 36, and he did an exceptional job for a wretched (57-104) Pittsburgh squad. Even with those numbers, the sinker specialist didn't receive so much as a third-place vote in that year's Cy Young Award balloting.

    My list of favorites always includes Scott McGregor, and he's a solid choice as a third starter. The Orioles lefty finished with a career record of 138-108 (.561). Seasons of 20-8 in 1980 and 18-7 in 1983 were made possible by one of the game's most deceptive change-ups. George Brett's high school teammate combined an 85 MPH fastball with a low 70s change thrown from an across the body motion and pinpoint control (just 518 walks in 2140.1 IP) to become a popular player in Baltimore.

    Although he is never mentioned among the better postseason pitchers, McGregor deserves to be on that list. Ignore the 3-3 record and focus on the 1.63 ERA in 49.2 IP with just eight walks during the 1979 and 1983 ALCS and World Series to get an idea how tough McGregor could be in the clutch. He averaged 8.28 innings per postseason start. After losing 2-1 in Game 1 of the 1983 World Series, McGregor came back with a 5-0 complete game shutout to clinch a world championship for the Orioles.

    Fourth starters aren't going to be big names by definition, but reliability is a must. Conrado "Connie" Marrero was a competent performer, and his biography is one of the more unusual stories in baseball history.

    Like many Cubans, Marrero played for the Washington Senators. Listed at 5'5" to 5'7" by various sources, the righty made his big league debut at age 38 in 1950 and stuck with the Nats until turning 43 in 1954. During that time, Marrero completed 51 of 94 starts and went 39-40 with a 3.67 ERA (108+ ERA) for a team that was buried in the second division.

    An All-Star in 1951, Marrero's best season came in 1952 when he went 11-8 with a 2.88 ERA (ninth in the AL) in 184.1 innings pitched. His 124 ERA+ was good for eighth in the league. Marrero pitched in AAA with the Havana Sugar Kings until shortly after his 46th birthday in 1957. Not only did Marrero defy the odds against longevity as a pitcher, but he is doing the same in daily life. The oldest surviving major leaguer will turn 101 on April 25. What kind of career numbers could Marrero have posted if he had gotten the call to the majors before reaching middle age?

    If trade rumors are floating around the clubhouse, don't be surprised if Mike Morgan begins packing his bags. That's because the right-hander played for a dozen teams in a career than spanned from 1977 to 2002, and he fills the old-school role of spot starting, long relief and taking an extended stretch in the rotation when injuries occur.

    "Mo Man" began his big league career right out of high school in 1977. Bringing the 18-year old straight to the Oakland A's was Charlie Finley's idea, and it's obvious that Morgan would have been better off developing in the minors. A big league mark of 9-27 from 1977 to 1983 is a significant factor in Morgan's 141-186 (.431) lifetime record.

    Those who insist that won-loss records are a poor indicator of a pitcher's performance can point to Morgan as Exhibit A. He went 8-11 with a 2.53 ERA (136 ERA+) for the Dodgers in 1989. Add 9.2 innings to his 152.1 IP, and Morgan would have the fourth lowest ERA in the National League. The breaks evened out in 1999 when Morgan went 13-10 with a bloated 6.24 ERA (82 ERA+) for the Rangers.

    Baseball biases will show themselves when a person fills out a 25-man roster, and one of my eccentricities is obvious in the bullpen. Submariner and control artist Dan Quisenberry is the closer, and "Quiz" will be expected to go more than an inning per appearance when needed. Fellow underhanders Chad Bradford and Steve Reed fill set-up roles.

    Few pitchers have been more miserly with walks than Quisenberrry, who could go a month between free passes. He gave up just 12 walks in 136.2 innings pitched 1982 and followed that with 11 bases on balls in 139 IP in 1983. Still locked into the strike zone, "Quiz" surrendered just 12 walks in 129 IP in 1984 to complete a three-year run of giving up well under a walk per nine innings. To be precise, his BB/9 IP in those years was a mind-boggling 0.79, 0.71 and 0.84. Opposing hitters had no choice but to come up swinging.

    As a perennial fan of the underdog, I have to pick 5'6" Danny Ray Herrera as one of my lefty relievers. The other spot goes to Joe Ostrowski, who had the good fortune to be traded from the lowly St. Louis Browns to the Yankees on June 15, 1950. He can do everything from face a lone lefty hitter to tossing six or more innings when needed. Ostrowski was known for control, as he gave up just 98 walks in 455.2 career innings pitched.

    Just how different were the economics of baseball in the 1950s as compared to today? Not counting World Series shares, Ostrowski never earned more than $8500 a season, which meant he taught high school when he returned home to rural Pennsylvania after the season. Thanks to baseball artist and historian Ronnie Joyner for educating me about Ostrowski.

    My Hall of Famer - Tony Gwynn - starts in right field. He may not have been a slugger, but who's complaining about having a lifetime .338 hitter, eight-time batting champion, five-time Gold Glover and one of baseball's most likable guys on the team? How much do I want Gwynn on the roster? He beat out Stan Musial, Ozzie Smith, Maddux and Honus Wagner as my Cooperstown representative.

    Ever see a raw rookie for the first time and say "That guy is a special player"? Ellis Burks instantly impressed me as a young Red Sox centerfielder, and he had a long and successful career despite multiple knee injuries.

    Career totals of 2107 hits, 402 doubles, 352 HR, 1206 RBI and a .291 average aren't shabby, but it's easy to imagine Burks boosting those numbers without the nagging physical problems he endured. Burks had eight seasons with 20 or more HR and six seasons with 80 or more RBI. The thin, high altitude air of Colorado undoubtedly helped during a career year of 40 HR, 128 RBI, 211 hits and 45 doubles with the Rockies in 1996. There's another statistic from 1996 that showed what Burks could do when healthy, as he swiped a career-high 32 bases in 38 attempts (.842).

    This lineup needs an imposing presence, and Frank Howard surely meets that requirement. The 6'7" "Capital Punisher" had an incredible four-year power surge for the Washington Senators during a pitching-dominated era.

    Big Frank smacked 172 HR with 432 RBI (average seasons of 43 HR and 108 RBI) from 1967 to 1970. He led the American League with 44 bombs in 1968 and 1970. Howard's career best of 48 HR in 1969 fell one short of Harmon Killebrew's league-leading total. The right-handed slugger thrived under Ted Williams and became a much more patient hitter when #9 managed the Senators. Howard walked 60 and 54 times in 1967 and 1968 before doubling his bases on balls to 102 and a league-leading 132 in 1969 and 1970.

    Career totals of 382 homers, 1774 hits and a .273 average accumulated mostly in poor hitter's parks qualifies Howard for the cleanup spot in the lineup. Mainly a left fielder, "Hondo" also appeared in 334 games at first base.

    The fourth and fifth outfielders are a balanced pair, as Jim Dwyer hits from the left side, while Walt "No Neck" Williams is a right-handed swinger. A major leaguer from 1973 to 1990, Dwyer was a valuable role player for the Orioles from 1981 to 1988, and he homered against the Phillies in the 1983 World Series. Dwyer can play all three outfield positions as well as first base, has decent power and draws walks.

    Many of us who saw the stocky (5'6", 190 pounds) Williams with the White Sox from 1967 to 1972 liked him instantly, as the energetic fireplug played with exuberance and honest hustle. Williams was no slouch at the plate, as his .270 career average was high for the era. A career best .304 in 1969 was good for sixth place in the American League. Dependable line-drive machine Manny Mota (.305 lifetime, 150 pinch hits, 1149 for 3779 career) is my pinch-hitter, and he'll get an occasional start in the outfield.

    Since first basemen tend to be sluggers, it would be easy to put a power bat in this slot, but honesty compels me to go with a slap-hitting personal favorite. Mike Squires slammed just six career home runs in 1580 at-bats with the White Sox from 1975 to 1985, a most unusual record for a place in the lineup where the long ball is all but mandatory.

    At 5'11", "Spanky" was also small for a first baseman, but he ranks among the finest fielders at the position. The .260 career hitter won the AL Gold Glove in 1981, and he often was used as a late-inning defensive replacement.

    How good was Squires on defense? He flawlessly handled a dozen chances in 14 appearances and 38 innings at third base and had a pair of one-inning stints behind the plate.

    You say it's no big deal for a player to move around the diamond? Squires was a left-handed thrower, so it speaks volumes about his skill with the glove when Tony LaRussa decided to use the Michigan native as an occasional defensive replacement at 3B in 1983 and 1984. Since there are three other position players on the roster who have extensive experience at first base, it's likely that Squires would have a platoon role if this team were a reality - and I'll take him even with the lack of home run power.

    He never made an All-Star roster, but Marty Barrett is more than adequate at second base. As one the toughest strikeouts in the majors during his career, Barrett often batted second behind Wade Boggs for the Red Sox during his years (1982 to 1990) in Boston. Barrett's exceptional performance in the 1986 World Series against the Mets was all but wasted due to the lack of run production behind him. Imagine hitting 13 for 30 with five walks (.433 BA, .514 OBP) and scoring once in seven games.

    There's always room for a superutility player on my roster, and Mark Loretta is one of the best of this valuable and versatile breed. The sure-handed infielder could start at short or second and do a fine job at either position, but he also saw a fair amount of action at the corners.

    Loretta played 829 games at 2B, 405 games at SS, made 234 appearances at 3B and played 214 games at 1B. The right-handed swinger slashed line drives to the tune of 1713 career hits and a .295 lifetime average. Loretta followed up a .314 (ninth in the NL) season for the Padres in 2003 with a career year in 2004.

    In addition to a .335 average (third best in the NL), Loretta posted additional career highs in hits (208, second best in the league), HR (16) and RBI (76). Calling Loretta a super sub understates his value. He's good for 400 to 500 at-bats - maybe more - over the course of a season on this team.

    It was always a pleasure to watch Don Kessinger play shortstop for the Cubs during my grade school and teenage years. The six-time All-Star earned a pair of Gold Gloves with his hands, range and arm as he regularly stole hits from opposing batters. Kessinger usually led off for the Cubs. With just 14 HR in 7651 career at-bats (1931 hits, .252) and a .312 slugging percentage, the switch-hitter was the epitome of an old-school middle infielder.

    Jeff Cirillo could never be accused of being a slacker. The formers Brewers, Rockies and Mariners third baseman played with intensity despite being stuck on losing teams throughout his lengthy (1994-2007) big league career.

    At his best, Cirillo was a high-average doubles hitting machine with better than normal defensive skills. He came through with 46 two-baggers (good for fifth and second place in the American League) in 1996 and 1997 for Milwaukee, and Cirillo's 53 doubles for Colorado in 2000 was second best in the National League.

    Seasons of 194, 198 and 195 hits from 1998 to 2000 along with batting averages of .325 in 1996 and .321, .326 and .326 from 1998 to 2000 showed how Cirillo could perform consistently at a high level. What could derail such a successful career?

    A toe tap that Cirillo inadvertently picked up while in his stance threw the delicate balance of his swing off, and his numbers plummeted. The right-handed swinger crashed to .249 with just 6 HR and 54 RBI for the Mariners in 2002. Efforts to ditch the toe tap proved unsuccessful, and Cirillo struggled to stay in baseball. A revamped swing allowed Cirillo to make a comeback as a platoon player for the Brewers, Twins and Diamondbacks. He finished with 1598 career hits and a .296 average.

    The team's defensive replacement negates Loretta's skill with the stick. Ray Oyler has the worst batting average (.175, 221 for 1266) of any player with a minimum of 1000 ABs in the live ball era. The former Tigers and Seattle Pilots shortstop drew praise for his dependable glovework, but seasons such as a miserable .135 (29 for 215) for the world champion 1968 Tigers doomed Oyler to second-string status.

    As a former catcher, I appreciate solid defense and pitch-calling skills behind the plate. Jim Hegan never finished above .249 in a full season, but the lifetime .228 hitter was one of the key players on the Indians pennant winners of 1948 and 1954. When great defensive catchers are mentioned, Hegan's name is always part of the conversation.

    It would make sense to pick a lefty-hitting catcher to back up the right-handed swinging Hegan, but I'm partial to a modern-day defensive whiz who bats from the right side. If Henry Blanco is good enough to be chosen by Maddux as his personal catcher despite being an inconsistent hitter, he can play for my team when Hegan needs a day off. The Venezuelan-born Blanco can be Marrero's receiver, as they'll welcome the opportunity to communicate in Spanish.

    That's 24 players, so who gets the final spot on the roster? All of the following journeymen are likely get some time in the majors over the course of a season as players move up and down from AAA.

    Can a second-stringer increase attendance? One-armed Pete Gray appeared in 77 games for the St. Louis Browns in 1945 and hit .218 with just 11 strikeouts in 234 ABs, and fans eagerly bought tickets for the opportunity to see this unique athlete. If nothing else, Gray can be on the active roster in September as well as a midseason call-up when needed.

    Reserves who can competently play all three outfield positions give a manager some flexibility, and Tito Landrum fills that role. Landrum played for the Cardinals, Orioles and Dodgers from 1980 to 1988, and the right-handed swinger did a fair amount of damage against lefty pitchers. Few journeymen who never wore Yankee pinstripes can say they played for three pennant winners, but Landrum can make that claim.

    Kevin Hickey went from playing slow-pitch 16-inch softball on the south side of Chicago to the White Sox clubhouse at old Comiskey Park. It was Hickey's arm that propelled him from tavern league softball to the majors. I'm sure my reality-based team could use another lefty reliever as pitchers go down over the course of 162 games.

    Steve Fireovid spent more than a decade in AAA, but the right-hander's major league career was limited to 71.2 IP over six brief call-ups with the Padres, Phillies, White Sox, Mariners and Rangers from 1981 to 1992. A control pitcher, Fireovid is also the author of The 26th Man, a compelling account of life as a AAA lifer.

    There are better places for a young player to develop than snowy Wisconsin, and Vinny Rottino overcame that obstacle to make it to the majors. Signed as an undrafted free agent out of Division III Wisconsin-LaCrosse by the Brewers in 2003, Rottino has accumulated 36 at-bats in four sips of big league coffee with Milwaukee and the former Florida Marlins.

    Rottino catches and plays first and third base along with the corner outfield positions. It would seem that some team could use such a versatile guy off the bench, but Rottino has nothing more to show than brief September call-ups for his efforts.

    The right-handed hitter is a study in perseverance, as Rottino went back down to AA at ages 29 and 30 to stay in baseball. That determination was rewarded with a late season call-up by the Marlins in 2011. Vinny has a non-roster shot with the Mets this season, and it would be great to see him have to pay the inflated price of a New York apartment for at least a few months this year.

    Tommy Watkins spent a decade as an infielder in the Twins minor league system before getting his first and only opportunity in the Show. A 38th round pick in 1998, the 5'7" Watkins didn't make it to AAA until mid-2006. The call-up to Minnesota in August 2007 was a great human interest story, as Watkins was the classic organization man and loyal minor league solider.

    The rookie didn't embarrass himself, as Watkins hit .357 (10 for 28, all singles) before going down with an injury after nine games. That marked the end of the Cinderella story, as Watkins spent two more seasons at Rochester before becoming a coach in the Twins minor league system. Currently assigned to the Beloit Snappers of the Midwest League (Class A), the well-liked Watkins should have a long career in the game at some level.

    How about an up and coming young player who could fit nicely on the roster? Diamondbacks right-hander Josh Collmenter relies on control (just 28 walks in 154.1 IP during his 2011 rookie season) and deception rather than heat to get batters out, and he'll enjoy picking the brains of Reuschel, McGregor and Quiz.

    Who gets to run the team? As a stickler for fundamentally sound baseball, I want someone who insists on playing smart and has a track record for squeezing the most out of the talent at hand. Looks like a job for Tom Kelly or Joe Maddon. Either manager would be an excellent option.

    There is only one choice for my team's announcer, as I'll gladly pay Vin Scully whatever he wants to be on the air. Living in the Midwest means I don't hear Scully nearly as much as I'd like, but no one has ever made baseball sound so sweet as the voice of the Dodgers.

    Control pitchers and line-drive hitters dominate this roster. Take away Howard and Burks, and the leading power hitter couldn't be counted on for more than 15 homers. That's no surprise, as I've always leaned towards grinders and smart contact hitters. There are also a lot of genuinely nice guys (Howard, McGregor, Bradford, Gwynn, Squires, Williams, Barrett, Mota, Watkins and others), low-maintenance solid citizens (Reuschel, Hegan, Cirillo, Loretta, Fireovid, etc.) and people with a sense of humor (Lolich, Quisenberry, Reed) here to maintain harmony in the clubhouse.

    So who are some of the players on your reality roster? They can come from a single team or cover the major league spectrum. Go ahead and make your list.

  • Historical Hall of Fame Vote Comparisons: 2012

    Historical Hall of Fame Vote Comparisons: 2012

    For the past two years I have written a post taking a graphical look at Hall of Fame vote histories for players with similar first-year vote totals to players on the current year's ballot. Here is 2010's, which includes a description of the graphs, and here is 2011's. As I said these graphs are not meant as sophisticated projection into the future, but rather just a rough look at historical precedent. Folks like Chris Jaffe of the Hardball Times have a better handle on the dynamics of HoF voting and future ballot composition in order to make better prediction.

    This year's ballot had only one first-year player, Bernie Williams, who broke 5% and will be included on future ballots. Williams got 9.6% of the vote. Here I highlighted the vote trajectories of everyone else who got within 2.5% (7.1% to 12.1%) in their first year on the ballot.

    williams_HoFgraph2012.png

    There are a number of historical players who are not going to be a good guide for Williams' trajectory; Hall of Fame voting was much different in the past. Carl Hubbell, for example, was on 9.7% of the ballots in 1945, his first year; shot up to 50% in his second year; and by 1947 was inducted with 87%. Williams will not see a similar rise. More recent players in Williams's pool have fallen below the 5% cut off rather quickly. I left off the names because they would all bunch together but they include: Orel Hershiser, Graig Nettles, Bob Boone, Dave Stewart, Albert Belle, and Pete Rose. It will be interesting to see whether Williams can stick around for years like Don Larsen or fall off quickly like Hershiser and others.

    With no other first-year guys above 5%, I am going to look at some guys who have been on the ballot for a couple of years. In each case I chose a salient feature of their vote history to create a comparison pool. Up first is Jack Morris, who, on his 13th year on the ballot, was on 66.7% of the ballots. This is a pretty big jump from last year's total of 53.5%. With no great first year players on the ballot, it seems voters were a little more liberal with their votes on returning players, many of whom saw a double digit rise. For Morris's comparison I looked at anyone else who received between 65% and 70% on some ballot after their 10th.

    morris_HoFgraph2012.png

    All these guys eventually made it. Three through the standard 75% BBWAA voting, and then Red Ruffing through a runoff ballot, and Enos Slaughter and Jim Bunning through the Veterans Committee. So things look promising for Morris.

    Jeff Bagwell also had a nice increase, from 41.7% to 56%. Here are the players within 10% of these two vote totals.

    bagwell_HoFgraph2012.png

    This picks up other fast risers. Ryne Sandberg and Barry Larkin are bad comps because they are at the very high end of my comparison window for both years; Bagwell is not going to make it next year. He might slowly pick up steam like Andre Dawson or Tony Perez and make it around year ten. But with the amount of talent coming on and the PED stuff, I am not so sure.

    I will skip Lee Smith and turn to Tim Raines. Raines has had a nice increase in vote share over the past three years, and is now at 48.7%. I looked at players within 10% of his year-3 to -5 ballots (because they are much higher than his first two years).

    raines_HoFgraph2012.png


    Except for Smith who is still on the ballot, all these guys are in the Hall. Johnny Evers and Bunning made it through the VC. As with the Bagwell example this might paint too sunny a picture for Raines.

    Finally I look at Edgar Martinez. He did not get quite the same bump the other guys did, and has been pretty stagnant over his first three years. Here are players within 12.5% of each of his three vote totals.

    martinez_HoFgraph2012.png


    Jack Moore at FanGraphs made the Pee Wee Reese comparison. I think that Jack is right that Martinez will probably end up with a Reese-, Maury Wills-, or Steve Garvey-like trajectory, and not one that takes him up rapidly like Eddie Mathews or Rich Gossage.

  • An All-Christmas Team

    An All-Christmas Team

    Anyone who was born on or within a few days of Christmas has sad tales to share of feeling cheated by "one gift for two days" childhood presents. What kind of treats have been given to fans on December 25? This roster of Christmas babies includes three Hall of Famers along with a smattering of All-Stars and everyday players.

    No need to save the best for last, as the All-Christmas team appropriately leads off with Rickey Henderson (born 1958) in left field. His career numbers - 1410 stolen bases (a whopping 472 ahead of second-place Lou Brock's 938 SB), an all-time best 2295 runs scored, 2190 walks (second only to Barry Bonds) and 3055 hits - are jaw droppers.

    What else did Rickey do? How about three years of 100 or more steals (including a record 130 in 1982)? A dozen seasons as the league's leading basestealer includes topping the American League with 66 swipes in 1998 at age 39. Then there's 13 seasons with 100 or more runs scored, seven seasons with more than 100 walks (along with leading the AL four times) plus a quartet of 95 to 99 bases on balls and four 20-plus home run seasons. The Hall of Fame had to do some serious editing when they created Henderson's bronze plaque.

    Rickey played in the majors until just three months before his 45th birthday, and he closed with a 3 for 3 mark in stolen bases during a late season stint with the Dodgers in 2003. He was also one of the handful of position players who batted right-handed and threw from the left side.

    How about a textbook old-school number two hitter following the best leadoff man in history?

    A basestealer couldn't ask for a better partner than Nellie Fox (1925). Taking a pitch to let Henderson steal a base wouldn't have been a problem for the White Sox star, as he has been baseball's toughest strikeout in the past 75 years. It was a thankless job that Fox excelled at when he batted behind the speedy Luis Aparicio.

    The left-handed hitting Fox never struck out more than 18 times in a season, and he had 10 years averaging less than a K every 50 plate appearances. With 2663 career hits, a .288 lifetime average and six seasons of .300 or better and a four-time American League season hit leader, Fox would be well equipped to get on base for the heart of the order when Henderson didn't.

    Although he wasn't known for drawing walks, "Little Nell" had a knack for getting to first base. He led in American League in singles eight times (1952 and 1954 to 1960) while making the AL's top 10 list in batting average in eight seasons. Fox's 2161 singles puts him at 27th place in baseball history.

    The 1959 American League Most Valuable led the White Sox to the franchise's first pennant since the 1919 Black Sox scandal. Fox earned MVP honors with what was a fairly typical season by his standards - a .306 average along with just 2 HR and a career-high 70 RBI. One of Nellie's most impressive feats took place in 1959, as he avoided striking out in 98 consecutive games. The fateful whiff came on a called third strike tossed by Whitey Ford. Close Fox friend and long-time roommate Billy Pierce says the pitch was well off the plate and that the umpire's call even surprised Ford.

    A three-time Gold Glover (1957, 1959 and 1960), Fox was known for his sure hands, quick release and skill in turning the double play. With a streak of 798 consecutive games at second base (most ever for that position), Fox's durability and toughness made him hugely popular on Chicago's blue-collar south side where the vast majority of White Sox fans reside.

    Known for his bottle bat, small stature and ever-present wad of chewing tobacco, the last characteristic of Fox's image played a role in his death from cancer at age 47 in 1975. After just missing with 74.7 percent of the vote in his final year of Hall of Fame eligibility in 1985, Fox was admitted to Cooperstown by the Veterans Committee in 1997.

    Unfortunately, there are no suitable candidates for a starting shortstop on the All-Christmas team, but three-time Gold Glove second baseman Manny Trillo (1950) could do an adequate job on the left side of the infield. That's because Trillo had one of the strongest arms ever displayed at second. With a .263 lifetime average and 1562 career hits, the four-time All-Star provides some production at the bottom of the order.

    Switch-hitting Walter Holke (1892) gets the first base job largely by default. That's because Holke's career OBP of 89 for four National League teams is well below average, especially at a position usually reserved for big hitters. To his credit, Holke had 1278 career hits and a .287 average to offset his lack of power, run production and patience at the plate (just 191 walks in 4456 ABs).

    1923 appears to be Holke's banner season at first glance, at he hit .311 with 7 HR, 70 RBI and 31 doubles for the Phillies. Those numbers were boosted by playing half his games in the tiny Baker Bowl with a live ball. In reality, Holke did a better job with the New York Giants and Boston Braves in the dead ball seasons of 1917 and 1919.

    Third base has a pair of lefty hitters for the Christmas babies roster. Tom O'Malley (1960) spent most of his career shuttling between AAA and the majors from 1982 to 1990. He finished with a .256 career average, 13 HR and 131 RBI in 1213 ABs (466 games) for six different teams.

    O'Malley's career took off when he went to Japan in 1991. As a valued member of the Yakult Swallows and Hanshin Tigers, O'Malley hit .300 or better with power (20 or more HR) for six consecutive seasons. Note to clubhouse man: Make sure O'Malley gets pregame meals of sushi and udon for peak performance.

    Like O'Malley, Gene Robertson (1897) has a middle of the pack major league resume. The 5'7" St. Louis native played on and off for the hometown Browns from 1919 to 1926 before being traded to the Yankees. Robertson spent 1927 with St. Paul fo the American Association before joining the Yankees for 251 at-bats (just six strikeouts) and nine more plate appearances in the 1928 World Series.

    A .280 lifetime average (615 for 2200) with gap power gives Robertson an edge over O'Malley. Frank Ellerbe (1895) played 3B for three American League teams from 1919 to 1924, but the righty swinger's lack of patience at the plate (.268 BA, .306 OBP) and below average power makes him better suited for spot duty.

    Ben Chapman and Jo-Jo Moore (both born in 1908) round out a solid starting outfield. Chapman led the American League in stolen bases four times (1931-33 and 1937). The right-handed swinger had a.302 career average with 1958 hits. Even though he wasn't a slugger (90 career HRs), Chapman came through with seasons of 122 and 107 RBI for the Yankees in 1931 and 1932. The three-time All-Star also had six other campaigns of 80 to 98 RBI.

    The World War II talent shortage allowed Chapman to extend his big league career, but as pitcher. He went 8-6 with a 4.39 ERA (84 ERA+) for the Dodgers and Phillies in 1994, 1945 and for a single appearance in 1946.

    Moore made the National League All-Star roster five times and spent his entire career (1930-41) with the New York Giants. A left-handed hitter, Moore had 200-hit seasons in 1935 (201) and a career-best 205 hits in 1936. With just 247 strikeouts and 348 walks in 5427 career at-bats (1615 hits, .298 lifetime), Moore was one of many old-time players who seldom struck out while not working the count for walks.

    "The Gause Ghost" got his nickname from his hometown of Gause, Texas. Moore died at age 92 on April 1, 2001.

    Our Christmas catcher had just 10 major league at-bats, but that cup of coffee wasn't due to any lack of ability on his part. Quincy Trouppe (1912) was one of the better Negro League receivers. Like other players who were stymied by the color barrier, Trouppe spent much of his career in Latin America in addition to bouncing around from team to team in the U.S. Negro circuit.

    At age 39, Trouppe backed up Jim Hegan for a few weeks with the Indians in 1952. He appeared in six games at had a single and a walk in 10 at-bats before being sent to Ottawa of the International League. He wasn't in the same class as Josh Gibson, but Trouppe had the ability to be a starting major league catcher if he had been given the opportunity at a younger age. Trouppe easily stands out from the glut of weak-hitting backup catchers (Chris Krug, Greek George, Marty Pevey, Frank Baldwin) who share a December 25 birthday.

    Hall of Fame pitcher James "Pud" Galvin made numerous adjustments during a big league career that spanned from 1875 to 1892. He pitched underhand and overhand just 50 feet from the plate.

    The 5'8" "Little Steam Engine" was an iron man even by 19th century standards. Galvin went 37-27 in 66 starts for Buffalo Bisons in 1879, as he appeared in all but 12 of the team's games. He pitched "only" 458.2, 474 and 445.1 inning in the next three seasons before tossing a record 656.1 innings (76 games, 46-29, 2.72, 117 ERA+) in 1883 and followed that up by going a career-best 46-22 with a 1.99 ERA (158 ERA+) in 636.1 IP in 1884.

    Seasons of 20-35 in 1880 and 16-26 in 1885 reduced Galvin's career record to 365-310 for a .540 winning percentage. This is a guy Bert Blyleven ("My goal was to be the workhorse of the staff") could appreciate. You're our number one starter, Pud, but you'll have to adapt to being 60 feet 6 inches from the plate with a mound (wasn't used until the 1890s). How will the workaholic Galvin adjust to having four days off between starts? He has been a Hall of Famer since 1965.

    Ned Garver (1925) fills the 2 slot nicely. The 86-year old pulled off one of the most impressive pitching accomplishments in history when he went 20-12 with the last-place 1951 St. Louis Browns. Since the perennially inept Browns were 52-102, Garver was responsible for 38.5 percent of the team's victories. The Brownies went just 32-92 (.258) when Garver didn't receive a decision.

    Did Garver get the Cy Young Award? That honor didn't exist until 1956, so Garver had to settle for a second-place finish behind Yogi Berra in the MVP voting. A career record of 129-157 with mostly losing teams is a poor way to judge Garver's skill. His career ERA of 3.73 and 112 ERA+ is a more accurate indicator. Garver swung the bat well enough to see occasional duty as a pinch-hitter. His career stats include seven home runs, 180 hits and a .218 average.

    This rotation screams for a lefty, and Lloyd Brown (1904) is it. The Beeville, Texas native went 91-105 with a 4.20 ERA (105 ERA+) in a big league career than lasted from 1925 to 1940. 1930 to 1932 was the peak of the southpaw's career, as Brown went 16-12, 15-14 and 15-12 with the Senators. A career-best 3.20 ERA was good for fourth place in the AL in 1931. The 5'9" Brown was tagged with the nickname "Gimpy" in what was obviously a much less politically correct and sensitive era.

    Welsh-born Ted Lewis (1872) pitched in the majors from 1896 to 1901. He went 21-12 with a 3.85 ERA (116 ERA+) for the 93-39 (.705 winning percentage) 1897 Boston Beaneaters. Lewis followed that up with a career-best 26-8, 2.90 (127 ERA+) in 1898 for Boston. Lewis spent his entire big league career in the city. His final season came during the American League's debut in 1901. The 5'10" righty went 16-17 with a 3.53 for the Boston Americans, later known as the Red Sox. A 94-64 career record with a 3.53 ERA (113 ERA+) is definitely better than average for a number 4 starter.

    Charlie Lea (1956, recently died on November 11) should be dependable at the back of the rotation. The right-hander went 62-48 with a 3.54 ERA for an injury-shortened career with the Expos and Twins. A 15-10, 2.89 ERA (seventh in the NL) performance with Montreal in 1984 was good enough to provide Lea with his only All-Star appearance.

    Hideki Okajima (1975) is the closest thing to a potential closer on the All-Christmas team. The Japanese-born Red Sox lefty reliever has a U.S. career record of 17-8 with a 3.11 ERA and six saves in 261 games and 246.1 IP. Journeymen such as 19th century hurler George Haddock (born in 1866 and 95-87, 4.07 from 1888 to 1894), Eric Hiljus (1972, 8-3 and a 4.79 ERA in parts of four seasons with the Tigers and A's) are in the mix for long and middle relief.

    So is Jack Hamilton (1938), who is notorious for beaning Tony Conigliaro. The wild righty had a 32-40 career mark, and his 4.53 ERA is quite high for the offensively eager 1960s. Mike Blyzka's major league record (3-11, 5.58) is unimpressive, but his two seasons included playing for the final St. Louis Browns squad in 1953 and the first-year 1954 Baltimore Orioles.

    Team depth is pretty ordinary. Wallace Johnson (1956) gives the Christmas squad a capable pinch-hitter who also displayed enough speed (19 SB) to pinch-run when needed. As a switch-hitter, a manage could insert Johnson into any situation. Nearly 60 percent of Johnson's career knocks (86 of 145) came off the bench.

    Bill Akers (1904) played around the infield for the Tigers and Braves from 1929 to 1932, and he's a utility infielder with more pop in his bat (11 HR, 69 RBI, .261, .349 OBP) than average. Ruben Gotay (1982) and Rich Renteria (1961) provide competition for Akers.

    Speedy Willy Taveras (1981) is a 1970s-style Astroturf chopper/slasher who seems out of place in the 21st century. Scott Bullett (1968) is another possibility for a backup job in the outfield.

    Since America is in a significant recession, costs need to be managed. That's why former White Sox and Pirates manager Gene Lamont (1946) gets to back up Trouppe behind the plate in addition to running the squad. Lamont may not see much playing time, as the one indispensable member of the roster is also a backup catcher - and he was born on December 9. How could this happen?

    What would the all-Christmas team be without Steve Christmas? The lefty-hitting catcher played 24 games with 37 ABs (.162, 1 HR, 7 RBI) in three small cups of coffee with the Reds, White Sox and Cubs from 1983 to 1986. With that name, it doesn't take a December 25 birthday to earn a roster spot on the all-Christmas team.

  • The New-Look Angels

    The New-Look Angels

    The news that the Los Angeles Angels signed Albert Pujols to a ten-year contract for $250 million has motivated me to put up my first post in a month.

    While I would have preferred a shorter and less expensive contract, anything under ten years and $250 million was not going to seal the deal. As such, the way to think about this signing from an Angels' perspective is to break it into two five-year periods. That's right, 5x30 and 5x20 for an average of 10x25. Sure, 5x25 and 5x15 might be closer to what Pujols is likely to produce in terms of value but an aggregate of $200 million was going to come up short of luring the three-time NL MVP to Orange County.

    Pujols turns 32 in January so the Angels just signed him to a 10-year deal with a no trade clause for his age 32-41 year-old seasons. I think he will give the Angels five very good-to-great seasons for a 1B and five average-to-good seasons for a 1B/DH. If one thinks about it as I suggested above, the Angels can easily justify the first five seasons. I mean, wasn't the consensus calling for as much as an 8 x 25-30M deal as recently as last winter? Sure, Albert's numbers fell off a tad this year but he put together an outstanding second half and postseason. In other words, I believe he is basically the same player today as he was perceived a year ago. Pujols may not earn his keep during the second half of the contract unless baseball salaries inflate significantly between now and then. But that's the risk the Angels had to take to acquire the greatest right-handed hitter of the past 80 years, if not ever.

    Ironically, after signing Pujols and C.J. Wilson (5/$77.5M), the Angels actually have more flexibility than they did yesterday. Therefore, it says here that Arte Moreno and Jerry DiPoto will pull off at least one more headline signing or trade before spring training. At a minimum, they have freed up Mark Trumbo and possibly Ervin Santana. In addition, the Halos can easily move Peter Bourjos, if need be, plus Bobby Abreu (if they agree to eat at least half of his contract) and either Alberto Callaspo or Maicer Izturis.

    Where am I going with this? Well, I wouldn't rule out going after David Wright or Ryan Zimmerman. The Mets are reportedly interested in Bourjos. The Nats have been linked to him, too, and have indicated a desire to shore up center field and first base. Why not a Bourjos and Trumbo deal for Zimmerman? The Mets have Ike Davis and Sandy Alderson and Paul DePodesta aren't likely to be interested in Trumbo's low OBP. As such, the Angels might have to replace Trumbo with Hank Conger. Either way, I would only give up those packages for Wright or Zimmerman if I could sign them to a longer-term deal first as both are under team control for just two more years. Wright is owed $15M in 2012 with a team option at $16M for 2013 and Zimmerman is due $12M in 2012 and $14M in 2013.

    Let's dream for a minute, Angels fans. Assuming the Halos trade Bourjos and either Conger or Trumbo for Wright or Zimmerman, here is a potential lineup for 2012:

    Trout, CF
    Kendrick, 2B
    Wright or Zimmerman, 3B
    Pujols, 1B
    Morales, DH
    Hunter, RF
    Wells, LF
    Iannetta, C
    Aybar, SS

    While I realize that Mike Scioscia would never start the season with Trout as the lead-off hitter, he can flip Trout and Erick Aybar in April and May until he realizes how much better Trout is. After he makes that change, he can flip Chris Iannetta and Aybar if he's worried about having three RHB in the 6th through 8th slots.

    If Kendrys Morales doesn't recover from his leg injury, then the Angels can slide Abreu into the role of DH, hit him first or second in the batting order, slide Howie Kendrick down to sixth or seventh, and not miss much of a beat.

    Here is how the starting rotation stacks up:

    Weaver
    Haren
    Wilson
    Santana
    Williams

    That would be about as strong as any rotation this side of Philadelphia.

    Here is how the bullpen shapes up at this moment in time:

    Walden
    Downs
    Thompson
    Takahashi
    (and perhaps two of three of Jepsen, Richards, and Cassevah)

    Add Ryan Madson (hey, it's not my money) as the closer and you're looking at a team that would be favored to win the World Series.

    ***

    You can read more about the Pujols and Wilson signings at Halos Heaven, which has several articles and links to other posts at SB Nation.

  • John Denny: The Forgotten Cy Young Award Winner

    John Denny: The Forgotten Cy Young Award Winner

    A friend of mine, Ross Moskowitz, is the director of Camp Westmont, a beautiful summer camp in the Pocono Mts. of Pennsylvania. It's the kind of place every kid should be able to attend at least once in their lives. He's also a baseball man. Played Division One NCAA baseball at the University of Maryland. So when he told me that John Denny was going to be his baseball instructor this past summer, I thought it would make for a very interesting story/interview. How does a good pitcher become the best pitcher in the world for one season and win the Cy Young award? From Bob Turley to Randy Jones to Mark Davis to Pat Hentgen, just to name a few, there have been a bunch of pitchers who've taken that step.

    I spent a morning with John Denny at the end of August. He's 58 years old now and has kept in great shape. Simply put, he's one of the nicest, soft-spoken people I've ever met. Aside from working for the Arizona Diamondbacks for a few years, he hasn't had that much to do with Major League Baseball since he retired in 1986. Like most former ballplayers, he has a amazing memory of games, players, even specific at-bats from 25-35 years ago. He's also quite introspective about himself and his place in the game's past. His response to my question "So you won Game One of the 1983 World Series?" was unexpected. "Yeah, how about that," as if he still couldn't quite believe his good fortune. We went off topic at times, but his stories about his Hall of Fame teammates were worth hearing. I turned on the tape recorder.

    David: In looking at your career, the numbers tell a story of a pitcher with obvious talent, twice leading the NL in ERA, who would follow those seasons with quite a few off years. Were injuries a major factor?

    John: Injuries were a big problem for me. My rookie year, 1975, I started the season 2-2 for St. Louis, they sent me back to Triple-A for a month. When I came back, I won seven games in a row, I'm 9-2 and some people were talking about me as a Rookie of the Year candidate. One day, I'm jogging in the outfield in Cincinnati and I tore a lateral ligament. We were only a few games out of first, so I pitched through it and wound up 10-7. The next year, 1976, I was healthy and led the league in ERA (2.52). Then, in 1977, I started the season 7-0 and I strained my hamstring covering first base, then tore that hamstring at Dodger Stadium. And I wound up going 8-8. 1978, I was healthy again and had another good year (14-11, 2.96 ERA).

    David: Who was your manager with the Cards?

    John: Red Schoendeinst was my first manager, then Vern Rapp and finally Ken Boyer. This was right before the Whitey Herzog era. I would've loved to have played for Whitey, but I was traded to Cleveland. But I loved my time in St. Louis. I played with Joe Torre, Bob Gibson and Lou Brock. They were true professionals and some of that rubbed off on me.

    David: So you go from a great baseball city to playing in Municipal Stadium?

    John: It was tough. That park seated 80,000 people, so even if we had 40,000 people in the stands, which we rarely did, it was half empty. And I think that affected a lot of our players. We had a good rotation. Bert Blyleven, Rick Sutcliffe, myself, Rick Waits, who won 15-16 games one year. Later, Len Barker. After a few years, I became a free agent while with Cleveland. And George Steinbrenner offered the world to me, but I turned him down.

    David: I never knew that.

    John: My agent handled it all. I never met Steinbrenner, but his quote the next day in the newspapers was something like "John Denny will never wear a Yankee uniform as long as I'm alive." I would've loved to have played for the Yankees, but word was he was very interfering, came down to the locker room all the time. I didn't think I could play for an owner like that.

    David: I've never been shy about my feelings for him. I believe he demeaned the game more than anyone in my lifetime. Younger people, especially Yankee fans, forget just how hated he was in New York until they started winning again in 1996.

    John: Well, he offered me the best contract with wonderful perks and opportunities for the future. I would've been way better off financially. But my thinking was I worked very hard and I played the game very hard. And I pictured myself working my butt off, putting every ounce of energy I had into the game. I was a thinking pitcher and I studied the hitters. And I pictured if things weren't going well, he'd call me into his office and air me out. And then go to the papers and tell them what he just did. I didn't want to put myself in that situation. And I eventually wound up with the Phils and I loved my time there. I missed almost the entire 1982 season, but then got involved with a strength and flexibility coach that Steve Carlton recommended and he helped me enormously.

    David: Before we get to your time with the Phils, let me ask you, "Who was your toughest hitter to face? Who lit you up?"

    John: Easy, Tony Gwynn. His pitch recognition was incredible. So I'd make some adjustments and the minute I thought I had him, he'd make adjustments too. Always one step ahead of me. As time went on, I thought I was starting to figure him out. If he had a weakness, it was inside. But you couldn't live in there. The moment you thought you could pound him inside, he'd make that adjustment and take you deep. So I'd go to my sinking fastball and start to pitch him away, but he used to take that to left field really well.

    David: How was Willie Stargell to face?

    John: I don't know what my actual stats against him were, but I'll tell you this story about Stargell. I was pitching in Pittsburgh one night and I threw him a fastball, down and away. He turned that sucker around right up the middle. I could hear that ball singing as it went by me. It short-hopped the fence in left center for a double. He hit it so hard and I remember thinking to myself that ball might've killed me. From then on, I pitched him only inside and I didn't care if he hit it five miles. He was a true professional too, an old school guy and I was a newer type of player. And I learned so much from the old schoolers.

    David: Who else?

    John: Pete Rose. I pitched a great game one night with St. Louis against the Big Red Machine — Monday Night Game of the Week. The next day he calls me over before our game. I'm 23 years old and I'm wondering what does Pete Rose want to talk to me about? He says "John, I just want to tell you last night you threw one hell of a ballgame. Your fastball was in on my hands all night. But I'll tell you something, next time I'm gonna get you good, you S.O.B." More than anyone, he helped show me how to be a professional and still show respect to the other team and the other players and still be the man and the player you need to be.

    David: Let's talk about the 1983 Phils and your Cy Young season. Who was your pitching coach there?

    John: Claude Osteen, who had been my teammate and pitching coach with the Cardinals. He was the perfect pitching coach for me.

    David: The 1983 Phils are one of my favorite teams. The team had started to age quite a bit, had a lot of veterans, Schmidt, Carlton, Rose. Then they get even older by adding Joe Morgan and Tony Perez at the end of their careers and they win the pennant. Remarkable story.

    John: They called us "the Wheeze Kids." (The 1950 pennant winning Phils were called the Whiz Kids).

    David: Right. Now, obviously, you were healthy. Did you add a new pitch, change your motion?

    John: No, but a few things happened. First, I was in great shape, the best of my career. I had started working out with a strength and conditioning coach, Van Hoefling. He had been with the Los Angeles Rams and when Roman Gabriel was traded to the Eagles, Van followed him to Philly. And Lefty and I got involved with him. And he was great for me. But no new pitch or motion. I was basically a fastball, curve pitcher. And I could add some sink or movement to both of them, so I guess I threw four pitches.

    The biggest difference was that I was playing on a team with guys who knew how to win and it rubbed off on me.

    David: It was attitude?

    John: Attitude and being in great shape. Here's one example and this is what I loved about Pete Rose. I'd get two strikes on a batter and I'd hear him yell or whistle from his position at first base. "You got two strikes on this guy, you know what to do." Because you never want to lose a batter with two strikes on him, you need to finish him off. And Rose was the kind of guy who pounded it home. Just like his career. He took the talent he had and pounded it home, never let up. He stayed on me all year. I am so blessed I was able to play with him. And Lefty and Schmitty and Morgan and Perez too.

    Lefty and I had lockers next to each other. Talk about two different guys. I was a Christian and he believed in Eastern religions, mysticism. But we were so close, worked out in the offseason together. One time I said to him, "Lefty, I've never thrown a slider in my life, show it to me." So he held the ball up, put his hand up and says "I just turn my wrist a little bit like this and I throw the shit out of it." (Laughter).

    He had great catchers in Bob Boone and Tim McCarver who got to know him as well as he knew himself. I don't recall Lefty shaking off many pitches. And it was a combination of three things. I know what I'm doing out here, I really don't need to take charge because my catcher is handling it very well and I know I can throw what they want.

    David: What a huge advantage for a pitcher.

    John: Oh yeah. One of the things I tried to do was not to get into a disagreement with any catcher. If he's calling for a fastball down and away and I want to throw up and in, I would say to myself "What the heck, I can throw down and away and still get this guy out." And it made me a better pitcher and it also made my catcher better too because now he knows that I trusted him and then they would work even harder and call a better game." And Lefty had his catcher's trust and that's huge.

    David: What was it like in 1983 to look behind you and see Rose at first, Morgan at second and Schmidt at 3rd?

    John: You know, the first real ballgame I ever saw in my life, I was ten years old (1963) and my Little League coach, who I still stay in touch with, he was like a father figure to me, took me to Los Angeles from where I was born and raised in Arizona.

    David: Were you a Dodgers fan?

    John: Well, actually I used to listen to the Giants all the time because I could get KNBR radio very well where I lived. Willie Mays was my favorite player. So he took me to a Dodgers/Giants game. Juan Marichal and Don Drysdale and the Dodgers won 1-0 in the bottom of the 9th inning. I can still remember Marichal throwing that incredible overhand curve for a strike with that big leg kick. So at 10 years old, I get to see two great Hall of Fame pitchers in this great pitching duel and in 1983, I get to play alongside five Hall of Famers.

    Now we played mostly on Astroturf back then. Perez, Morgan and Rose were all on their way out, had already lost a step, but anytime there were runners in scoring position, they'd always dive for balls. They saved me run after run after run. They always gave it everything they had and we won the pennant that year to a large degree because of their professionalism. And that leadership rubbed off on Schmitty and we desparately needed that because he could be quite volatile. The fans could really get on him.

    David: Give me an example of Schmidt's leadership.

    John: I was pitching against Nolan Ryan in Philadelphia. I was down 2-1 in the bottom of the 8th. Ryan was so unhittable that day, throwing darts. Top of our order, he goes through the first two guys. Garry Maddox or Gary Matthews, I can't remember which, draws a walk. Schmitty comes up and Ryan had been making him look terrible all day. Schmitty had no chance. Ryan was on the attack the whole game — attack, attack. He goes 3-2 on Schmitty. And Schmidt would always try to analyze what pitch was coming. Everyone on the bench was hoping for a fastball, because if Ryan dropped that hook on him, he had no chance.

    Ryan was grunting on every pitch, never saw anyone throw harder than he did that day. He was so intimidating. Fastball. Ball landed in the second deck and we won the game 3-2. Now that's talent, but it's also leadership because Schmitty knew no one else on our club could touch Ryan that day. It was up to him.

    David: So you win the pennant and you win Game One of the World Series?

    John: Yeah, how about that.

    David: Was the game at the Vet?

    John: No, it was in Baltimore, won it 2-1, beat Scott McGregor. I gave up a home run to Jim Dwyer, who was my minor league teammate on the Cardinals, pitched well rest of the game. Only game we won.

    David: 19-7, 2.37 ERA, Cy Young Award, win a World Series game.

    John: Pretty great year to live through.

    For the past 30 years, David Bromberg has lived in Northeast Pennsylvania, former home of the Scranton/Wilkes Barre Red Barons (Phils Triple A team) and current home of the S/WB Yankees Triple A team. He was dubbed "the most inveterate baseball fan in northeast Pa. by Ron Allen, who hosted the local nightly sports radio call-in show there.

  • Baseball America
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    College Top 25 Chat: March 25
    Aaron Fitt took readers' college baseball questions on March 25.
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    Update: STL -- Struggling through a June with an ERA over 10, the once-reliable Trevor Rosenthal has been removed from closing duties in St Louis, at least for now. There's no obvious replacement, but the mix of the most-trusted Kevin Siegrist, the best-stuff Seung Hwan Oh and the most-experienced (and once great) Jon Broxton will all hold down the fort until Rosenthal figures himself out again. (6/26/2016)
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    These prospects have moved up in our composite rankings recently: Jameson Taillon (#22)... Manuel Margot (#39)... Willson Contreras (#51)... Cody Reed (#55)... Seung Hwan-Oh (#95)... Billy McKinney (#117)... Rio Ruiz (#176)... Tyrell Jenkins (#219)... JT Chargois (#231)... Hunter Dozier (#300)... Santos Saldivar (#486)... Jake Reed (#612)... Elvis Sabala (#629)... Yeremy Rosario (#638)... Anderson Castro (#865)... Christian Capellan (#933)... See our detailed prospect rankings for more info. (9/19/2017)
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    Ken Arneson confronts his white whale in the final blog entry on BaseballToaster.com. "Load the harpoons, gentlemen, it is showdown time. Today, my adventure as a baseball blogger ends. I'm going down, and I'm taking Moby Dick with me."
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    If you've been paying attention lately, you've noticed that Baseball Toaster has had a bunch of its knobs and switches and dials and wires fall off in recent months. Today, with the largest part of our engine leaving to join the Los Angeles Times, we are officially sending the Toaster to the scrap heap.
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    It hurts, any time you lose something you care about, something that's been a part of your life for years. It hurts, any time you watch as a community you love slowly fades away, as much by your own doing as anyone else's. You flog yourself with notes of things unwritten, things unsaid, with thoughts of what could have come to pass, with dreams of success left unfulfilled, and it hurts even more. But such is the way of the world.
  • Humbug Journal: My Final Take-It-Or-Leave-It Offer

    Humbug Journal: My Final Take-It-Or-Leave-It Offer
    Because I'm retainingScott Boras I'll hold out, and not join the chorus With new homes online. If you want me tosign, Bid a mil and a golden thesaurus.
  • The Juice Blog: Official Moving Day is Here

    The Juice Blog: Official Moving Day is Here
    (Go to nsfwsports.com if you want to find Scott's new blog site.)
  • Mop-Up Duty
  • Kevin Pillar?s Latest Antics Should Come As No Surprise

    Kevin Pillar?s Latest Antics Should Come As No Surprise
    Last night, Toronto Blue Jays’ centre-fielder Kevin Pillar appeared to shout a homophobic slur directed at Atlanta Braves’ reliever Jason Motte.  It can clearly...
  • Targeting The Next Marco Estrada

    Targeting The Next Marco Estrada
    When the Toronto Blue Jays first acquired Marco Estrada from the Milwaukee Brewers via trade, he brought to (my) mind another former Brewers pitcher...
  • Revisiting My Toronto Blue Jays? 2017 Lineup Projection

    Revisiting My Toronto Blue Jays? 2017 Lineup Projection
    10 weeks ago I consulted my crystal ball to try to get a clearer picture on what the Toronto Blue Jays’ opening-day lineup would look...
  • A Memorable Toronto Blue Jays Opening Day

    A Memorable Toronto Blue Jays Opening Day
    During Spring Training in 1988, then-Blue Jays Manager Jimy Williams announced that left-fielder George Bell would be the full time DH, both to save...
  • Ranked: The Best Outfield Arms in Blue Jays History

    Ranked: The Best Outfield Arms in Blue Jays History
    While watching the Toronto Blue Jays play the Baltimore Orioles on Opening Day last week, I saw a tweet by Blue Jays statistician Scott Carson...
 
 
  • Wax Heaven
  • The Only Baseball Card I Want

    The Only Baseball Card I Want
    It’s funny how things turn out. By the spring of 1992, Jose was a unanimous MVP, multiple time All-Star, two-time Home Run King, the highest-paid baseball player in the world and was even having an affair with the biggest pop singer of the times, Madonna. He was a young millionaire who owned a fleet of […]
  • Analyzing A 2016 Baseball Card

    Analyzing A 2016 Baseball Card
    I have spent the past few days on eBay, looking at Jose Canseco baseball cards produced in 2015 and this year. I have seen a lot that I would consider “filler” and not worth picking up but this particular card (below) has caught my eye. It comes from Topps’ Tribute brand and features an early-year […]
  • Growing Old Sucks

    Growing Old Sucks
    I remember bustin’ wax packs in 1990 and loving the card designs of the time. Occasionally, I’d pull something that would feature a design from yesteryear, be it the 60s or 70s and thought to myself how ugly these cards looked and how I wish they wouldn’t waste my time with them. I can’t begin to imagine […]
  • ?and so it begins (again)

    ?and so it begins (again)
    It’s been 6 long years since I wrote a blog on the original Wax Heaven. A lot has happened since then. I am not here to bore you with the rise and fall, that’s for another day. Instead, I am writing the first post to say that, I really don’t care about baseball cards anymore. […]
  • And So It Ends

    And So It Ends
    Author: Mario Alejandro There was once a time when The Hobby ran through my mind 24/7. Here I was cranking out over 100 articles per month, recording box breaks to post on YouTube, scouring eBay for new cards I needed, and making online trades in every popular online forum available. Oh, did I forget to […]
  • TORONTO STAR
  • The top 5 Toronto intersections for condo re-sales

    The top 5 Toronto intersections for condo re-sales

    When it comes to re-sale condos, some of the city's key downtown intersections appear to be cornering the market with prices up to 23 per cent higher than the city-wide average, according to a Tuesday report from TheRedPin.

    The real estate company looked at 25 key intersections in the core. It found two-bedroom condos at Bay and King Sts., and Bay and Bloor Sts. fetched some of the highest prices in Toronto between January and Aug. 31 — averaging above $1.5 million.

    Two-bedroom apartments in the tony Yorkville neighbourhood at Bloor St. and Avenue Rd. sold for $1.3 million on average. But one-bedroom condos near that corner were more expensive than the Bay St. intersections — costing $753,735, compared to $494,591 at Bay and King, and $626,989 near the corner of Bay and Bloor.

    Read more:

    Sales of $4 million-plus Toronto homes poised to rebound

    Toronto home prices sink further in August

    Drop in GTA home prices prompts new warning: seller beware

    The average one-bedroom unit in Toronto sold for about $545,000 during the same period and a two-bedroom condo cost about $925,000 on average.

    "At the busy traffic intersections things can be 20 per cent or more valuable," said Enzo Ceniti, TheRedPin director of sales training.

    "If you're an investor and looking for areas to buy then you probably want to target areas like that. If you're someone who wants to be close to a particular intersection because you grew up around there or you work near there and you want to be within walking distance, you might need to pay a little bit more," he said.

    Fifty-six per cent of condos at the 25 intersections were one-bedroom units and 30 per cent were two-bedrooms. The remainder would be studios and some larger apartments.

    "At these intersections you can see the re-sale value will be very, very good. Conversely the rent in those areas can be just as high," said Ceniti.

    A similar study by TheRedPin last year showed that condos along the Bay St. corridor sold for more than Yonge St.-area apartments.

    This year's report averaged prices within a 0.25-km. radius of each corner — about a three-minute walk. It is an overview, says TheRedPin. Given the confined areas of the study a couple of high or low sales can dramatically alter the average at a particular corner.

    TheRedPin reports that the least expensive one-bedroom condos were at the corner of Queen and Yonge Sts., with an average price of $371,444. There were no two-bedroom sales at that intersection.

    The lowest sale prices for two-bedroom units were at Yonge and Dundas Sts. where the average was $658,234.

    Pre-construction condos where consumers have to visualize what a floor-plan will look like before the building actually exists, offer good value but the reward is more immediate in the re-sale market, said Ceniti.

    "When you're purchasing re-sale you can step into that unit and look around. I can see amenities, I can see exactly where my parking spot is. If you're more visually inclined, re-sale is the way to go — instant gratification really," he said.

    Condo prices appreciated 24.8 per cent year over year in the first eight months of 2017, compared to single-family homes that went up 19.8 per cent in the same period.

    Condos outside the downtown tend to cost less. A one bedroom at Yonge St. and Finch Ave. averaged $424,698 during the study period. Two-bedrooms cost $583,014 on average.

    Apartments at Ellesmere and McCowan Aves. sold for $356,227 on average for a one-bedroom and $500,800 for two.

    The distinction between the house and the condo market has been shrinking as apartments are increasingly the entry-level home for Toronto-area consumers, he said.

    For years there was a sense that ground-level housing would appreciate more year over year, said Ceniti.

    "Now, as the study shows, condo prices have really increased," he said. "Part of that is just that condos are just much more accessible so a lot of people would prefer to buy them for a low overall cost. As a result it does actually get a little bit competitive. When it gets competitive, prices go up."

  • ?We shall survive by the grace of God?: Hurricane Maria pounds Dominica with catastrophic force

    ?We shall survive by the grace of God?: Hurricane Maria pounds Dominica with catastrophic force

    ROSEAU, DOMINICA—Hurricane Maria smashed into Dominica with 257 km/h winds, ripping the roof off even the prime minister’s residence and causing what he called “mind-boggling” devastation Tuesday as it plunged into a Caribbean region already ravaged by Hurricane Irma.

    The storm was on a track to wallop Puerto Rico on Wednesday “with a force and violence that we haven’t seen for several generations,” the territory’s governor said.

    Dominica Prime Minister Roosevelt Skeritt said on his Facebook page that “initial reports are of widespread devastation” and said he feared there would be deaths due to rain-fed landslides.

    He said even his own house had lost its roof, adding “I am at the complete mercy of the hurricane. House is flooding.” Seven minutes later, he reported he had been rescued.

    Maria’s eye roared over the island late Monday night before the storm briefly dropped to Category 4 strength early Tuesday before resuming its extremely dangerous Category 5 status.

    Fierce winds and rain lashed mountainous Dominica for hours. A police official on the island, Inspector Pellam Jno Baptiste, said late Monday night that there were no immediate reports of casualties but it was too dangerous for officers to check conditions.

    “Where we are, we can’t move,” he said in a brief phone interview while hunkered down against the region’s second Category 5 hurricane this month.

    “The winds are merciless! We shall survive by the grace of God,” Skerrit wrote at the start of a series of increasingly harrowing posts on Facebook.

    A few minutes later, he messaged he could hear the sound of galvanized steel roofs tearing off houses on the small rugged island.

    Read more:

    Hurricane Irma ‘extinguished’ a 300-year-old civilization in Barbuda

    Putting hurricanes and climate change into the same frame

    In Irma’s aftermath, Black residents of St. Martin complain France is evacuating white tourists first

    He then wrote that he thought his home had been damaged. And three words: “Rough! Rough! Rough!”

    On the nearby island of Martinique, officials said about 25,000 households were without electricity and two small towns without water after Maria roared past.

    The head of French civil security, Jacques Witkowski, told reporters that it was too soon to say whether the French department of Guadaloupe had fared as well.

    Prefect Eric Maire, the highest French official of Guadaloupe, said in a video on Twitter that some roads and homes were flooded and heavy rain expected to continue. He told the population to “remain inside.”

    Authorities in the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, which faced the possibility of a direct hit, warned that people in wooden or flimsy homes should find safe shelter before the storm’s expected arrival there on Wednesday.

    “You have to evacuate. Otherwise, you’re going to die,” said Hector Pesquera, the island’s public safety commissioner. “I don’t know how to make this any clearer.”

    Maria had maximum sustained winds of 260 km/h late Monday when it slammed into Dominica.

    The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Maria weakened briefly before recovering sustained winds of 260 km/h strength shortly before daybreak Tuesday, with its eye located about 100 kilometres west-southwest of Guadeloupe. The storm was moving west-northwest over the Caribbean at 15 km/h.

    Forecasters warned Maria could even intensify over the next 24 hours or longer, noting its eye had shrunk to a compact 16 kilometres across and warning: “Maria is developing the dreaded pinhole eye.”

    That generally means an extremely strong hurricane will get even mightier, said Brian McNoldy, a hurricane researcher at the University of Miami. He said it’s just like when a spinning ice skater brings in their arms and rotates faster.

    “You just don’t see those in weaker hurricanes,” he said.

    The storm’s hurricane-force winds extended out about 45 kilometres and tropical storm-force winds out as far as 205 kilometres.

    Hurricane warnings were posted for the U.S. and British Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Guadeloupe, Dominica, St. Kitts, Nevis and Montserrat. A tropical storm warning was issued for Martinique, Antigua and Barbuda, Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Maarten, St. Lucia and Anguilla.

    Forecasters said storm surge could raise water levels by 1.8 to 2.7 metres near the storm’s centre. The storm was predicted to bring 25 to 38 centimetres of rain across the islands, with more in isolated areas.

    Close to its path is the island of St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands, where territorial Gov. Kenneth Mapp said Tuesday would be “a very, very long night.”

    St. Thomas and St. John are still stunned from a direct hit by hurricane Irma, which did extensive damage and caused four deaths on the two islands.

    Barry University said it chartered a private plane to carry students and staff from its St. Croix facility to Florida in preparation for Maria. It said 72 people connected to the Barry’s Physician Assistant Program and a few pets were on Monday’s evacuation flight.

    In neighbouring Puerto Rico, nearly 70,000 people were still without power following their earlier brush with Irma and nearly 200 remained in shelters as Maria approached.

    Gov. Ricardo Rossello said Puerto Rico had 500 shelters capable of taking in up to 133,000 people in a worst-case scenario. He also said the Federal Emergency Management Agency was ready to bring drinking water and help restore power immediately after the storm, which could hit as a Category 5 hurricane.

    “This is going to impact all of Puerto Rico with a force and violence that we haven’t seen for several generations,” he said. “We’re going to lose a lot of infrastructure in Puerto Rico. We’re going to have to rebuild.”

    Rossello warned that an island-wide power outage could last a “long time” given the power company’s deteriorated and weak infrastructure.

    To the north, hurricane Jose stirred up dangerous surf and rip currents along the U.S. East Coast, though forecasters said the storm was unlikely to make landfall. Big waves caused by Jose swept five people off a coastal jetty in Rhode Island and they were hospitalized after being rescued.

    A tropical storm warning was posted for coastal areas in Rhode Island and Massachusetts, and tropical storm watches were up for parts of New York’s Long Island and Connecticut.

    Jose’s centre was about 590 kilometres south of Nantucket, Massachusetts, early Tuesday and moving north at 15 km/h. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 120 km/h.

  • Bitter legal battle involving Canada?s richest woman ends with a whimper: DiManno

    Bitter legal battle involving Canada?s richest woman ends with a whimper: DiManno

    Imagine being a gazillionaire heiress and apparently not allowed to buy a private jet without permission from the penny-counters.

    Oops, there goes $87 million out of the family company holdings as reimbursement, naughty lady.

    Imagine being the richest woman in Canada — purportedly (but do correct me if I’m wrong) — and having your feet held to the fire for repayment of $132 million shelled out, without proper authorization, on personal expenses and investments.

    Oops, there goes another chunk of cash “diluted” from the fortune chest, a.k.a. Westerkirk Capital Inc., by means of shrinking the lady’s equity stash from 21.8 per cent to 19.8 per cent to 17.9864 per cent.

    Allegations. Allegations. Allegations.

    What is the hunk o’ have world coming to?

    Well, what it came down to on Monday, after a week of lawyer huddles, was the slam-bang-thank-you-ma’am settling of duelling lawsuits between Sherry Brydson — granddaughter of Roy Thomson, Canadian newspaper baron and niece of Kenneth Thomson, founder of the Thomson Corporation, with a personal fortune estimated at $6.6 billion — and James Lawson, axed CEO of Westerkirk but still high profile boss of the Canadian Football League and Woodbine Entertainment Group, Canada’s premier horse racing enterprise.

    “It’s over,” said Howard Levitt, lawyer for Brydson, as he came back into the courtroom ’round noon to collect his robes.

    This comment was directed at but one of the many reporters who’d been whiling away the hours since last Monday, anticipating a juicy trial over money and maligning and alleged malfeasance — with a bit of porn thrown in on the side.

    And by over we mean that no details will be disclosed about the settlement reached betwixt Brydson and Lawson, including that aforementioned stuff about the jet, etc., which comes from Lawson’s opening salvo, factum-style.

    So we’re back where we started: Boxes of legal wrangle filed over the past four years, stuffed with facts and fomentation — a litany of allegations that will never be proved or disproved in a courtroom.

    (This is the part where we in the media note: None of the allegations have been tested in court. It’s all factum hearsay.)

    Aside: Around the Star newsroom, we, in the death throes of the newspaper business, regularly snipe about the Globe and Mail’s financial security. The national broadsheet is owned by the Thomson family through Woodbridge Company Ltd. Vanishing revenues? “All they have to do is sell another Group of Seven painting.”

    Brydson, according to court documents from the Lawson side of the legal ledger, “conducts herself as if she is the head or matriarch of the Brydson family and the owner of Westerkirk. However, at all material times, she was, in fact, only a minority non-voting equity participant in Westerkirk.” (See above, 17.9864 per cent.)

    Lawson was hired as Westerkirk CEO in November, 2004. He was fired by Brydson — allegedly without authority from the company’s management oversight committee, or its directors — in November, 2012.

    No fair, harrumphed Lawson who claims in the documents that, under his stewardship, Westerkirk, for arguably the first time, “established itself as a credible and astute investor” — $500 million in investments between 2005 and 2012.

    The pre-existing problem, Lawson’s original filing argued, was that “Ms. Brydson persistently acted as if she owned Westerkirk and was entitled to treat it as her personal corporation.”

    A piggy-bank.

    And an obstructionist, the factum continues, like that time she last-minute scotched the acquisition of a brick manufacturer — which would have been the company’s largest acquisition to date.

    That’s all water under the bridge and would likely not have surfaced but for Lawson bringing a suit claiming wrongful dismissal, seeking $24 million in damages, which included $3,895,177 in base salary from 2013 to 2016 and more than $2 million in bonuses.

    He was sacked, Lawson maintains, for trying to run Westerkirk professionally.

    Nah, Brydson countered, through her lawyers. He was jettisoned for exploiting his position to benefit himself and his relatives, while “publicly disparaging Brydson, her husband and family members,” running the company like a personal fiefdom, “as if it was his, not hers.”

    They’ve had loads of time to load up on each other.

    Brydson, who describes herself as a former journalist — she resides in Victoria, B.C. — asserts that she’d been on the prowl for a “scrupulously honest” CEO to manage the assets of Westerkirk.

    This, she insists, in not what she got.

    Nope, Lawson was never a senior lawyer at the Torys law firm (established by the grandfather of Mayor John Tory) as described, merely a “relative newcomer” on who she and her companied relied “to their detriment.”

    Lawson, she contents, repeatedly refused or failed to fulfil his most fundamental obligations and duties to herself, to Westerkirk, by “his repeated pattern of withholding information, acting dishonestly and promoting his own interests instead of those of Westerkirk . . . ”

    Self-dealing, she termed it, such as allegedly buying land in Oakville for a company where his wife was one of the directors and then wholly failing to “mentor” one of her children who would be “placed at a desk . . . and learn the business.”

    There was a posh condo at the Ritz Carlton, as well, owned by Lawson’s daughter, Brydson claims, which he talked her into buying as an investment for 40 per cent in excess of its actual value.

    He further allegedly manoeuvred to put friends into various Westerkirk concerns for which they had no business knowledge.

    What else? Impossible to distil pounds of paper into a newspaper column. But there was that bit about Lawson arranging to have himself appointed to a senior position with the Ontario Jockey Club and Woodbine; doing extensive work for them on Westerkirk time, using Westerkirk staff and resources, whilst — during one period in 2012 — simultaneously earning $22,035 a month from Woodbine, which he “hid” from Westerkirk and Brydson.

    And, oh yes, about that porn . . .

    Reminding, once more, that none of these allegations have been proven in court.

    Brydson complains that Lawson, despite enacting anti-pornography policies at Westerkirk and its related companies, “indulged himself,” at the office, “in gross, hard-core racist and misogynistic pornography, openly degrading to women and certain ethnic groups, including graphic depictions of BDSM and of sex between humans and animals.” So vile, the documents continue, that they would likely be deemed obscene under the Criminal Code, and that he distributed some porn to others, including subordinates.

    This Lawson adamantly denies in his counter-counter filing.

    As CEO, Brydson maintains, Lawson was “a dreadful role-model of workplace conduct” who poisoned the workplace and recklessly damaged the company’s reputation, to say nothing of her own.

    All the time ridiculing her and the family, to others, Brydson claimed, as “clueless,” allegedly telling one associate that “Brydson is a lost cause and we have to forget about her and move on to the kids.”

    Sometimes the Family Compact of Upper Ontario feels hardly a heartbeat away.

    But of course none of this will now be explored in open court. They’ve zipped up and swept their messes back into the closet.

    Some minimum wage cleaner will be along shortly to take out the garbage.

    Rosie DiManno usually appears Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.

  • WSIB to review more than 250 General Electric plant claims in Peterborough

    WSIB to review more than 250 General Electric plant claims in Peterborough

    Ontario’s Workplace Safety and Insurance Board will re-examine more than 250 rejected claims dating back to 2004 from former employees of Peterborough’s troubled General Electric plant.

    The review, announced Monday, comes four months after a comprehensive study of chemical exposures at the factory found working conditions between 1945 and 2000 played a significant role in an “epidemic” of work-related illnesses among employees and retirees.

    “The Peterborough community has presented information that helps clarify the exposures people had to various chemicals and substances,” said Armando Fatigati, WSIB vice-president of complex claims.

    “We’ll be looking at what they were exposed to, how much of it they were exposed to, and how long people were exposed to these chemicals and substances,” he said in a statement.

    A dedicated review team will look at both cancer and non-cancer related claims where updated scientific research links specific levels of chemical exposures to specific illnesses.

    The review will also look at claims where advances in technology may allow widows, widowers and children of former workers who died without realizing their deaths may have been linked to a workplace illness, the WSIB said.

    The WSIB will also work to identify next-of-kin who may be eligible for compensation for claims that were previously denied.

    “If you worked at GE Peterborough and think you may have a work-related illness but are not sure you have a claim with the WSIB, we want to hear from you,” Fatigati said. “If you qualify for additional health services or benefits, we want you to get them as quickly as possible.”

    People can call 1-800-387-0750 or visit wsib.on.ca/GEPeterborough to learn more and file a claim.

    Last month, the plant with a history of more 125 years in Peterborough, announced it would be closing next year, throwing more than 350 employees out of work.

    Read more:

    Lethal legacy: General Electric’s Peterborough plant was a symbol of opportunity for generations of workers — but did it also make them sick?

    Peterborough GE plant with lethal legacy closing down

    GE workers paying price for decades of exposure to toxic chemicals: Report

    But a company spokeswoman said the closing was related to changing markets and not to outstanding workplace illness claims.

    “GE has, and will continue, to work cooperatively with WSIB to provide information in a response to claims as requested,” said the company’s spokeswoman ‎Kim Warburton.

    Sue James, whose father Gord worked at GE Peterborough for 30 years and died of lung and spinal cancer — diseases his family believes were caused by his exposure to workplace chemicals — said the community is cautiously optimistic.

    “Although they haven’t said they have accepted our report, it would seem to suggest they are listening,” said James, who also worked at the plant for 30 years and was among 11 retirees who worked as advisors on the chemical exposure study.

    “That was our goal, to show there was a bigger picture, that as soon as you opened the door to that factory, you were at immediate risk because of everything that was going on around you,” she said Monday.

    “There were so many chemicals, welding fumes, painting, machining, in every area of the plant. You couldn’t get away from it,” she said.

    According to the report, workers at the factory that built everything from household appliances to diesel locomotive engines and fuel cells for nuclear reactors, were exposed to more than 3,000 toxic chemicals, including at least 40 known or suspected to cause cancer, at levels hundreds of times higher than what is now considered safe.

    Former worker Roger Fowler 71, who believes he developed colorectal cancer due to working for more than 22 years under asbestos-wrapped pipes that shed fibres of toxic snow, isn’t celebrating yet.

    “I want to see money in our pockets,” he said. Although he beat the cancer, he continues to wrap the football-sized hernias pressing on his bladder, the result of seemingly endless surgeries.

    “We’ve lost over 60 people since May,” he added. “We can’t keep going on promises.”

    Although Fowler and others were worried they would have to undergo more medical tests as part of the review, a WSIB spokesman said that likely won’t be necessary.

    “Every case is unique, but in terms of medical tests or new medical information... we will look at what we have on file and look at that against the new information,” said Aaron Lazarus. “As a broad response, we are not asking everybody to retake any kind of test.”

    WSIB also wants people with new forms to come forward or to check up on old ones.

    Peterborough MPP Jeff Leal called the WSIB review “a significant start and a major breakthrough” for GE workers and said that reviewing 250 files is just a starting point.

    “We’re going to continue to pursue this so all the claims can be dealt with in a fair and responsible manner,” he added.

    Leal, whose father worked at the plant for 40 years and died of lung cancer a year after he retired, predicted a final decision on the previously rejected claims and any new ones would be made in the next few months.

    In a joint statement Monday, Labour Minister Kevin Flynn and Leal said the WSIB has assured them they “will get workers results as quickly as possible.”

    “Our government will be closely following the progress of the WSIB’s reviews to ensure progress is being made,” they said.

    “The former GE workers and their families have never given up during this process, and they deserve the justice they have sought for so long,” they added.

    A Star investigation last fall revealed decades worth of government reports on the Peterborough plant that repeatedly warned of poor housekeeping, shoddy ventilation and lack of personal protective equipment amid massive use of materials now known to be carcinogenic.

    A 2002 GE-commissioned mortality study found male employees were up to 57 per cent more likely to die of lung cancer than the general population and female workers up to 129 per cent more likely.

    But when the study controlled for “other factors” such as age and smoking in a follow-up study, there was “no statistically significant increase in cancer at the Peterborough facility,” GE previously told the Star.

    The plant has employed tens of thousands of workers over its 125-year history in Peterborough, and their health and safety has always been the company’s “No. 1 priority,” GE has said.

    Following the Star’s investigation, the provincial labour ministry announced it would set up a dedicated occupational disease response team by the end of 2017 to boost prevention of chemical exposures and help sick workers file compensation claims.

    Since 1993, decisions have been made in more than 2,400 claims related to GE Peterborough with more than 80 per cent allowed, according to the WSIB. However health researcher Bob DeMatteo, who helped the retired GE workers on their May report, noted that just 27 per cent of cancer-related claims have been accepted by the board.

    With files from the Peterborough This Week

  • Google bankrolls Canadian school program targeting fake news

    Google bankrolls Canadian school program targeting fake news

    Google Canada is taking aim at the looming threat of fake news ahead of election season by bankrolling a new project to boost media literacy among youth — a move at least one expert says is a good first step, but not a cure-all.

    Through its philanthropic arm, Google.org, the tech giant is providing the Canadian Journalism Foundation (CJF) and CIVIX, a charitable organization focused on youth civic engagement, with a $500,000 grant to develop and deliver NewsWise — a program that will teach students how to suss out and filter so-called fake news and misinformation online.

    Fake news came to the fore in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Take Pizzagate for instance, a bogus conspiracy story that surfaced during the election and prompted a North Carolina man to fire an assault rifle in a Washington, D.C. pizzeria.

    Canada has not been immune to fake news. Earlier this year, false reports circulated about the deadly Quebec mosque shooting.

    More recently, a GTA imam was reportedly surprised to find photos of him accompanying an article claiming victims of Hurricane Harvey had stormed a Texas mosque that refused to help Christians.

    Ottawa is currently working on ways to tackle the spread of misinformation online.

    In the meantime, with the Ontario election slated for June 7, 2018 and the 2019 federal election not far behind, there is heightened potential for misinformation to eke out online, according to Aaron Brindle, Google Canada’s head of public affairs.

    “We see implications for what (fake news) means for a functioning democracy . . . We want to make sure that we’re getting out ahead of it,” Brindle said.

    The program will gradually be rolled out across the country to as many as 1.5 million kids aged 9 to 19 and baked into CIVIX’s Student Vote initiative, which already runs mock elections at 98 per cent of Canadian school boards.

    NewsWise will be in place in Ontario classrooms in time for the spring election and fully operational countrywide ahead of the federal vote in 2019.

    CJF and CIVIX will develop the curriculum in tandem.

    Taylor Gunn, president at CIVIX, said the aim is to breed savvy citizens.

    “I don’t think you can have informed citizens that are approaching the ballot box with knowledge and information if those citizens aren’t equipped with those skills to determine what is true or false news — especially at election times, where I think fake news would either be most in existence, or people could be most sensitive to it,” Gunn said.

    Asked to grade Canadian kids on their current understanding of what makes a credible source of information, Gunn said he has heard differing accounts from teachers. While some educators believe students have a strong grasp of media, others feel they understand how to consume information, but not to determine what makes it accurate.

    As one teacher put it to Gunn: “They don’t have any levels of news literacy.”

    Though many of the young folks getting schooled won’t be eligible to cast ballots in the next election, CJF executive director Natalie Turvey said there is an “urgent need” to educate future generations on fake news and misinformation, lest our democratic process be undermined.

    “Canada is vulnerable to fake news. The abundance of information on numerous platforms, the downsizing of Canadian newsrooms, and a dearth of local news creates a perfect storm for the proliferation of misinformation,” Turvey said.

    “We need to give (students) the know-how and the skills and knowledge to find and filter information. That’s how we can build a more informed citizenry, folks that are more equipped to make decisions and be more engaged in the democratic process.”

    Though boosting news literacy in the classroom is a good first step, it isn’t “necessarily sufficient,” said Edward Greenspon, president and CEO of the Canadian Public Policy Forum.

    “It may be the first line of defence, but it’s not the ultimate line of defence,” Greenspon said.

    He stressed the need for self-regulation by online platforms as key to combating fake news.

    Google has attempted to do just that by introducing fact-check tags to its search results earlier this year — but Brindle said only a “very limited” number of third-party Canadian publishers, which do the actual fact-checking, have signed on. Bing, the Microsoft search engine, has followed suit and added its own fact-check label this week.

    Jacob Schroeder of FactsCan — an independent non-profit site dedicated to debunking political stories — confirmed he is “really excited” about Google's feature but as yet does not have much experience with it, because his firm just signed up.

    Only one Canadian news outlet has published a story using the fact check tag thus far, Brindle said. South of the border, Politifact, CBS and the Washington Post use the tag.

    That said, Brindle noted implementation is “being explored by most Canadian news organizations.”

    Facebook — recently under fire for being a choice platform of alleged Russian interference of the 2016 U.S. presidential election — is also set to announce an election integrity initiative “in the near future,” with an eye to protecting the next federal vote from cyber threats, said a spokeswoman for the social media heavyweight.

    The initiative is in part a response to a first-of-its kind June report from the Communications Security Establishment — the country’s electronic spy agency — which concluded multiple hacktivist groups “will very likely deploy cyber capabilities in an attempt to influence the democratic process during the 2019 federal election.”

    It followed an Ipsos survey in May that suggested the majority of Canadians could not determine what constituted fake news.